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The Gospel of John: Revealing the Invisible God 

A Bible Study by Fred Kenison

 

Chapter 13


 

 

The last supper

A new commandment

 

Summary Highlights of Chapter 13

 

 

This book is a verse-by-verse commentary.  To go to the commentary for any particular verse in Chapter 13, please click on a number below.

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The last supper

Beginning with this chapter, John made a dramatic shift in what he chose to emphasize in Jesus' ministry. In the first 12 chapters, John concentrated primarily on his public ministry. Now, however, the emphasis changed to the private ministry directed to his disciples. Will Jesus be any more successful in explaining himself to them than he was to the Jewish crowds? The balance of the study will answer this question.

 

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13:1     Now before the feast of the Passover, Jesus knowing that his hour has come that he should depart out of this world to the father, having loved his own which [were] in the world he loved them to [the] end.

 

This verse indicates the timing of the following events. The Passover was the feast where the paschal lamb was slain. Jesus came into this world to be the lamb of The God, slain from the foundation of the world. He knew his remaining time on earth was limited, "that his hour has come that he should depart out of this world to the father."  This would be his final Passover until his second coming.

 

Depart comes from metabainoo, which means,

"to pass from one place to another, to remove, depart" (Thayer, p. 404).

 

This word was well chosen by John to emphasize that Jesus would transfer from one place to another. He would go from "this world to the father" in heaven.

 

World comes from kosmos, which indicates the populated portion of the world. Jesus was leaving all the people on this earth and going to be, pros, face to face, with the Father. Again, this would indicate that Jesus and the Father are not one entity but two.

 

"Having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them to the end."  These were the disciples whom Jesus designated as his own. These were the ones who had given themselves totally to his service, and had traveled with him, and suffered with him. He loved them to the end. His love for them never wavered, and now he had separated them from the rest of the people that he might teach them of things which were to come.

 

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13:2     And supper taking place, the devil already having put into the heart of Judas, Simon's [son] Iscariote, that he should deliver him up.

 

This event is spoken of as the last supper, the last time Jesus would eat the Passover meal with his disciples. Events had already taken place which would bring about the planned exit of Jesus from this world.

 

"The devil had already put into the heart of Judas...that he should deliver him up."  The word devil, diabolos, is not a noun, nor is it a name. It is actually an adjective, often used as a pronominal, or as a noun, although it is not a noun.

 

To better help understand this, diabolos would be the adjective, "dividing," with "one" added to it. Thus, the devil would be a dividing one. Anyone who separates, or divides, another from the purposes of The God, would be a devil. For example, when Jesus told Peter that he must be crucified, Peter said, Not so, or do not do that. Jesus turned to him and said,

"Get thee behind me, satan," or devil (Matthew 16:23).

 

What was the dividing one, the devil, which had already put in Judas' heart to deliver Jesus up? It was his own fleshly nature, which he had given over to the love of money, or greed. Man is a bipartite being, both a spiritual entity and a soulish, or fleshly, physical, entity.

 

One may be dedicated to the service of The God, and thereby a spiritual person, or dedicated to the things of the world, and thereby a fleshly person. If the latter, that person would be considered a foil of the devil, or someone used by his fleshly, soulish nature. Judas followed his soulish tendencies, or his devil, to deliver Jesus up to those Jews who had been searching for him.

 

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13:3     Jesus knowing that the father has given him all things into [his] hands, and that from The God he came out and to The God goes,

 

What was it that kept Jesus faithful to his calling? Three things are listed in this verse. First, Jesus knew "that the father had given him all things into his hands."  All authority in heaven and in earth had been given to him. What an endorsement that was! Even more, what a responsibility it was, knowing that the heavenly father had entrusted all this to him.

 

Second, Jesus knew that "he had come out from The God."  This was something that no one else could claim. His origin had been directly from the Father, as he was the very word of The God made flesh. He had been sent from the Father.

 

Third, he also knew that when he left this earth, he would "go to The God."  He would return to The God, and receive from him the authority which he had laid aside when he came to earth as a human being. The authority which he had experienced as Jehovah would again be his, without the necessity of being subject to holy spirit as he was while here as a man. Knowing these things gave him the ability to continually humble himself, even to his disciples.

 

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13:4     He rises from the supper and lays aside [his] garments and having taken a towel he girded himself;

 

In the midst of the supper, Jesus rose from the table and removed the outer robe, or garment, which was commonly worn over the inner clothes. Then, "he took a towel and girded himself."  In our jargon, we would say that Jesus tied the towel around his middle. These actions were the prelude to an action which must have been a mental shock to his disciples. They had revered him as teacher, and they had looked upon him as much superior to themselves. Teachers in that day were held in great respect.

 

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13:5     Afterwards he pours water into the washing-basin, and began to wash the feet of the disciples, and to wipe [them] with the towel with which he was girded.

 

After he removed his outer garment, and wrapped a towel around himself, Jesus "pours water into the washing-basin."  Two basins were normally used in washing someone's feet. Water was poured from one basin over the feet, and caught in another. This exchange of the water from the basins was continued until the chore was finished, and then "he dried the feet with the towel."

 

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13:6     Therefore he comes to Simon Peter, and he says to him, Lord, dost thou wash the feet of me?

 

Simon Peter, always the impetuous disciple, was the first to question what Jesus was doing. He was not sure that Jesus should be washing their feet. He felt that this duty was beneath Jesus.

 

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13:7     Jesus answered and said to him, What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter.

 

Jesus knew that his time with them was limited. Therefore, he taught not only with his words, but also by his actions, what he expected them to be in the future. He was expressing the attitude he expected them to show toward one another. Thus, he told Peter, "What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter."  Later, when a portion of holy spirit was come upon him, Peter would understand what Jesus was teaching by his actions.

 

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13:8     Peter says to him, in no wise mayest thou wash my feet for ever. Jesus answered him, Unless I wash thee, thou hast not part with me.

 

Peter did not want his teacher washing his feet. When he said, "no wise mayest thou wash my feet for ever,"  he used ouk, the absolute no. Peter was not hesitant in his opinions, regardless of how premature they may have been. For ever comes from eis ton aioona, or into the age. Peter was stating that Jesus would not wash his feet in this age, or in the next age!

 

Jesus, however, told Peter, "Unless I wash thee, thou hast not part with me."  Why would Jesus say this simply because Peter refused to have his feet washed by someone he revered? What Peter did not understand was that washing their feet was not just an act of humility on his part. By washing the disciples feet, Jesus was also empowering them for the spiritual walk which he expected of them. Peter would have missed his empowerment, and he could not have served acceptably.

 

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13:9     Simon Peter says to him, Lord, not my feet only, but also the hands and the head.

 

When Peter finally committed himself, he was totally committed. Peter wanted not only to be empowered in his walk, but he also wanted Jesus to bless what he does with his hands and his head. He wanted his very thoughts to be guided by the empowerment that Jesus would give him. He desired that his whole being, from his head to his feet, be prepared for the service of his lord, Jesus, the Christ.

 

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13:10     Jesus says to him, He that has been laved has not need [other] than the feet to wash, but is clean wholly; and ye are clean, but not all.

 

Why would Jesus make this statement? To put it another way, if the walk is right, than there is no need for the hands and the head to be washed. This is not the simple proposition that it may appear to be. We are to walk in faith. We are also to walk with the mind of Jesus, the Christ. This signifies that we should walk in love and humility toward others. Therefore, the proper walk, signified by Jesus washing the feet of the disciples, would also include what one did with the hands, and thought with the head.

 

"Ye are clean but not all."  Jesus was not speaking of the inefficiency of his washing, but was referring to Judas, who would betray him to the Pharisees and the leaders of the Sanhedrin.

 

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13:11     For he knew him who was delivering him up: on account of this he said, Ye are not all clean.

 

Neither Judas' walk, nor his hands, which stole from the common purse, nor his mind, which was full of greed was cleansed because Jesus washed his feet. The others were clean because of their complete dedication to the cause of Jesus, the Christ.

 

Jesus knew who would betray him. This ability to know what was in the hearts of men must have been a burden to the loving Christ. Thankfully, this ability has not been granted to us. Who could carry such a burden without the fullness of the holy spirit? Some proud men may claim such an ability for themselves, but religion is a great deceiver!

 

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13:12     When therefore he had washed their feet, and taken his garments, having reclined again, he said to them, Do ye know what I have done to you?

 

When he finished washing their feet, Jesus replaced his outer garment which he had removed. Then, he returned to the table, "and having reclined again,"  or taken his place, he asked the question, "Do you know what I have done to you?"  Jesus went on to explain to them what he had accomplished by washing their feet.

 

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13:13     Ye call me the teacher and the lord, and well ye say, for [so] I am.

 

Jesus acknowledged the manner in which his disciples referred to him among themselves. The remarkable part of this statement is that Jesus used the definite article before both "teacher" and "lord."  By doing so, he set himself apart as "the teacher," or a specific teacher, rated above all teachers.

 

The same would be true of "the lord."  Lord comes from the Greek kyrios, equivalent to the Hebrew adonai, which meant the one to whom they were to be obedient. Jesus is the lord of lords, and there is no other lord to which they were to be obedient, insofar as their spiritual life was concerned.

 

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13:14     If therefore I washed your feet, the lord and the teacher, also ye ought to wash the feet of one another.

 

Although Jesus was their teacher and lord above all other such, yet he had humbled himself to do the lowly duty of washing the feet of his disciples. In so doing, he magnified his office, but denigrated his personality to a level below their own.

 

"Also ye ought to wash the feet of one another."  Ought comes from the Greek word opheiloo, which means,

"that which is owed, one who owes another, a debtor. One held by some obligation, bound to some duty" (Thayer, p. 469).

 

By using this word, Jesus reminded them that this was a duty. He was not speaking only of washing one another's feet, but about the spiritual attitude they should have toward one another.

 

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13:15     I gave you for an example, that as I did to you, also ye should do."

 

This may sound like a simple task. However, humility is not easily accessed by the carnal flesh. I once observed a foot-washing ceremony in which those who participated seemed very proud of the fact that they had lowered themselves to wash the feet of others. Such an attitude does not even begin to fulfill the commandment which Jesus gave to his disciples.

 

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13:16     Verily, verily, I say to you, a bondman is not greater than his lord, nor a messenger greater than he who sent him.

 

Jesus was again reminding them that they were no greater than he. If he could humble himself before others, they were expected to do likewise.

"A messenger is not greater than he who sent him."  This is a startling statement, a double entendre. Jesus was speaking not only of their relationship to him as he sent them forth, but he was also stating that he is not greater than The God who sent him.

 

Jesus was always careful to clarify his standing with The God. He was a subjected one, and he always regarded The God as his superior. Men have replaced this clear distinction with their illogical doctrine of the trinity.

 

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13:17     If ye know these things, blessed are ye if ye do them.

 

Knowledge is not enough. They would be blessed only "if ye do them." Knowledge is fine, but wisdom is the acceptable application of that knowledge. In today's religion, many are misled by preachers and evangelists into believing that "spiritual experiences" are the epitome of spiritual life. This is simply not true. We reach the apex of our spiritual lives by serving others in the calling we have through the gift of that portion of holy spirit poured out upon us.

 

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13:18     I speak not of you all. I know whom I chose, but that the scriptures might be fulfilled, He that eats bread with me, lifted up his heel against me.

 

The phrase, "I speak not of you all," refers back to verse 13:11 which stated "ye are not all clean."  This is a further reference to Judas. The choice of Judas Iscariote was not one of ignorance, or happenstance. He was chosen "that the scriptures might be fulfilled."  The scripture Jesus referred to is Psalms 41:9.

"Yea, mine own familiar friend, in whom I trusted, which did eat of my bread, hath lifted up his heel against me."

 

This does not mean that Judas had no choice in the matter! Again, it should be stated that The God requires no one to practice sin. Judas was chosen because the foreknowledge of The God, given to Jesus through holy spirit, indicated that Judas would willingly fulfill the scriptures because of his evil nature.

 

"Lifted up his heel against me" is a Hebraic expression. Lifted up, in the Hebrew, means mostly to magnify. Thus, it is a colloquialism meaning to dispute one's authority and do them ill.

 

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13:19     From this time I tell you, before it comes to pass, that when it come to pass, ye may believe that I am [he].

 

The KJV translated "from this time" as "now."  But the sense of this would be easier understood if it had been translated as "henceforth."  Henceforth, before it come to pass, refers to the time when Judas will "lift up his heel" against Jesus, or betray him to the Pharisees, which will lead to his crucifixion.

 

All of this had been foretold in earlier prophecies and scriptures. Jesus knew the certainty of these things, and told his disciples, "that when it comes to pass, ye may believe that I am he."  Why would Jesus make this statement to his disciples? He knew that when he died, they would begin to question whether or not he was really the messiah.

 

To forestall any unbelief on the part of his disciples, Jesus assured them that his future fate was foretold by the scriptures. It was not because of men's manipulations, but because of the plans of his heavenly father. He was telling them not to let his crucifixion shake their faith in the truth that he was the messiah.

 

May believe is written in the aorist middle subjunctive, which means that because of what he has told them, eventually they will believe. The middle case indicates that they will participate in that belief.

 

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13:20     Verily, verily, I say to you, He that receives whomsoever I shall send, receives me; and he that receives me, receives him who sent me.

 

Jesus again used his peculiar formula of "verily, verily," or truly, truly, to preface a statement, assuring that what follows is the truth. Whomsoever comes from ean tina, where ean means if, and tina means that. This would be properly translated as "If he receives that I shall send."

 

Translating ean tina as whomsoever sounds as though Jesus would be sending a person, which is not the case. He will not be sending a person, but he will send holy spirit. Such inaccurate, misleading translations are related to the false doctrine of the trinity which teaches that holy spirit is a person. The scriptures say that holy spirit is truth.

 

Why does Jesus state that receiving holy spirit is receiving himself? Because when holy spirit has come, it will take the things that are his, and show them unto us. That spirit will not speak of itself, but of Jesus. Therefore, Jesus could make this statement.

 

Jesus also said that "he that receives me, receives him who sent me." Evangelicals, in particular, look at this scripture to justify their teaching that accepting Jesus as one's personal savior is the same as receiving The God. Not so! Jesus never taught that he and The God were one and the same.

 

"He that receives me, receives him who sent me."  This refers to accepting the truth of the relationship between Jesus, as being the messiah of The God, and the truth that he was sent by The God. It has nothing to do with believing Jesus as a personal savior, but that he is the christ, or messiah. That is what people are to believe.

 

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13:21     Saying these things, Jesus was troubled in spirit, and testified and said, Verily, verily , I say to you, that one of you will deliver me up.

 

Again, Jesus was troubled in spirit. His love, even for Judas, was a force which caused him great distress. In the spirit comes from en toi pnuemati, which refers to the deepest recesses of his being. His anguish was deep-seated. His distress was because one of his followers "would deliver him up."  This is the same terminology for distress that was used when Jesus found Lazarus dead. In that case, he had lost a friend; here, he had lost one of his disciples.

 

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13:22     The disciples therefore looked upon one another, doubting of whom he spoke.

 

Up to this point, the disciples had no idea "of whom he spoke."  It could have been any one of them. Judas had been so successful at hiding his thefts, and his greed, that the others had no idea of his treachery.

 

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13:23     But there was one of his disciples reclining in the bosom of Jesus, whom Jesus loved.

 

As the disciples reclined around the table, they laid on something resembling a bench. As Jesus lay there, one of his disciples was lying close to him, "reclining in the bosom of Jesus," or leaning on his chest.

 

There are a number of scriptures which use the term "whom Jesus loved." The apostle John never mentions the name of this disciple, perhaps out of modesty, as he is believed to be that disciple whom Jesus loved. Lockyear (p. 197) says this about John:

The original of his name means "whom Jehovah loves" and John's experience corresponded to his name. From the many references to this honored disciple we can gather these facts. He was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee. His godly parents were probably cousins of Christ, and John was their youngest son. His mother followed Christ, ministered unto Him, was at the Cross and among those who went to anoint the body of Christ with sweet spices. He was called to discipleship while plying his nets. He was the youngest of the disciples, the Benjamin among the Twelve. He was treated by Christ with greater familiarity than the others enjoyed. He sat next to Christ at the Last Supper. He was intrusted with the care of the mother of Jesus. He wrote the gospel and three epistles bearing his name, and also the Book of Revelation. [As this was a quote, the author's method of capitalization was followed.]

 

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13:24     Therefore Simon Peter makes a sign to him to ask who it might be of whom he speaks.

 

Peter, always the most impetuous and curious one, can not wait for Jesus to reveal the person who is going to deliver him up. He signaled to John, the beloved disciple, "to ask who it might be of whom he [Jesus] speaks." Will John respond to Peter's request?

 

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13:25     And he, having leaned on the breast of Jesus, says to him, Lord, who is it?

 

Perhaps John was as curious as Peter, or perhaps he felt he must respond to Peter, a disciple who was older than he. Whatever his reason, he did ask Jesus, "Who is it?"

 

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13:26     Jesus answered, He it is to whom I, having dipped the morsel, shall give [it]. And having dipped the morsel he gives [it] to Judas, Simon's [son] Iscariote.

 

Jesus answered John's question. He told John that he would "dip the morsel," or dip the bit of bread, in the bowl, and then give it to the guilty one. After Jesus dipped the morsel, he "gave it to Judas."  Although this seems clear enough, some of the following scriptures indicate that all the disciples did not know what Jesus had done. This thought shall be further explored as those scriptures are examined.

 

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13:27     And after the morsel, then the satan entered into him. Jesus therefore says to him, What thou doest, do quickly.

 

In most translations, satan is capitalized as though it were a proper name. However, it is not capitalized in the Greek, and therefore must be treated as a common noun, not a name. The word satan means an adversary. It is used throughout the scriptures as a personification of mankind's evil opposition to the things of The God, and his son, Jesus. Therefore, what entered into Judas was not a person, but the idea of betraying Jesus, of being an adversary to him, for the greed of money.

 

Jesus, knowing the hearts of men, also knew what Judas thought at the time. Therefore, he said to him, "What thou doest, do quickly."  Do not waste any further time, just get it over with. Go betray me to the Pharisees.

 

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13:28     But this no one of those reclining knew, wherefore he spoke to him.

 

No one knew. Not even the apostle John was privy to what must have been a quiet exchange between Jesus and Judas.  Acting in a manner foreign to most people, Jesus was quiet spoken. Under similar circumstances, most of us would probably shout angrily at someone we knew was going to betray us and be the cause of our demise.

 

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13:29     For some thought, since Judas had the bag, that Jesus is saying to him, Buy what things we have need [of] for the feast; or he should give something to the poor.

 

Judas carried the bag, or the purse, which contained the group's common money. As would often be the case, Jesus would speak to Judas about the disposition of that money. According to what some thought, Jesus was telling him one of two things: either buy something for the feast, or give something to the poor. Buying food and giving to the poor must have been the two primary uses for the common money.

 

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13:30     Therefore having received the morsel, he immediately went out; and it was night.

 

Judas left immediately. There was not much time between the thought of betrayal, and the implementation of the thought.

 

"And it was night."  Darkness is befitting deeds such as that contemplated by Judas. People do not come to the light because their deeds are evil, and therefore they love to act in the darkness. Judas was no different.

 

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A new commandment

 

13:31     When he was gone out, Jesus says, Now has the son of the man been glorified, and The God has been glorified in him.

 

Normally, when Jesus made such a statement he was speaking of his death for the reconciliation of the world unto The God. But, that had not yet happened, although his remarks implied that it had. Rienecker (p. 250) defines the word glorified.

"Used intransitively 'to display one's importance, greatness, or glory. It indicates that god has made a full display of his glory in the person of the son of man."

 

When Jesus spoke as though his death had already occurred, he was using a grammatical expression called a prolepsis. This means that what is spoken of is so certain of coming to pass that it is spoken of as a present truth.

 

The same is true of the words, "and The God has been glorified in him." Jesus was saying that when his crucifixion did take place, which it will, then the Father will be glorified in him, or that his obedience to the purposes of the Father brings about those results which will bring glory to the heavenly father.

 

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13:32     If The God has been glorified in him, also The God shall glorify him in himself, and immediately shall glorify him.

 

This is a first conditional sentence which is stated as a statement of truth. "If The God has been glorified in him" is not a question of will he or will he not. According to this verse, it will certainly happen. If this then be true, which it will be, then "also The God shall glorify him in himself, and immediately shall glorify him."

 

After the Father is glorified by the obedience of Jesus unto the death, then The God shall glorify Jesus in him, or in himself. This means that Jesus will be raised to a position of power in the very presence of The God and it shall be done immediately. Nothing else shall be required of Jesus to access this place of glory.

 

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13:33     Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye will seek me; and, as I said to the Jews, That where I go, ye are not able to come, also I say now to you.

 

Jesus had never before addressed his disciples as little children, which is a term of endearment. He was speaking to them as though they were small children under his care and nourishment. Anyone who loves to teach children understands this attitude. They were under his ministrations, and he had come to love them not only as his followers, but as his students.

 

"Yet a little while I am with you." He wanted them to understand that he would not be continuing with them in the future as he had been in the past. Their relationship was going to change because he was leaving. "As I said to the Jews, That where I go, ye are not able to come."  This was a reference to his earlier words (see John 7:33-34). Just as he told the Jews earlier, Jesus now told his disciples the same thing.

 

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13:34     A new commandment I give to you, that ye should love one another.

 

Knowing that his fast approaching death would usher in a new age, that of grace, Jesus gave his disciples one new law which would supercede all those of the Old Covenant. This was the new law of the new covenant: "that ye should love one another."

 

Quite simple? Not really! For someone to love another, they must make themselves vulnerable to hurt.

 

Too many people, who walk in the flesh, instead of in spirit, will draw back from such a commitment. Paul understood this perfectly, and he expressed in Romans 13:10 that,

"Love is the fulfilling of the law."

 

Even the disciples would soon be faced with how they would react to one of their own, Judas, who had given in to the temptation of money.

 

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13:35     By this, all shall know that ye are disciples to me, if ye have love among one another.

 

Jesus chose the demonstration of "love among one another" as the distinguishing mark which would set his disciples apart from the unbelievers.

 

This is rarely seen today in organized religious organizations. Why? Because the churches today are copies of secular organizations, subject to the same competition to be foremost as found in any other worldly group. Churches are seldom spiritual entities, but extremely carnal. Ambition, spitefulness, backbiting, and social climbing are the elements shown more often than the love commanded by Jesus.

 

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13:36     Simon Peter says to him, Lord, where goest thou? Jesus answered him, Where I go thou art not able now to follow me, but afterwards thou shalt follow me.

 

To people today, Peter's question may seem rather ignorant. But, remember, these people were taught that the messiah would never die. They looked upon Jesus as being this messiah, who would eventually form an army and deliver them from the domination of the Roman army. But, die? Never!

 

What is known now, but was unknown then, is that Jesus was not an unusual human being who would live forever in that body of natural flesh. He would die like any other man. But, as Jesus was telling them, they "were not now able to follow" him. He would be a first-fruits unto the heavenly father. That means that Jesus would be the first of all human beings to be resurrected with a glorified body. He would also be the first to ascend to the heavenly father.

 

Jesus told Peter, "afterwards thou shalt follow me."  Jesus knew that he would be crucified, but he also knew that Peter would follow him in like manner. This comment could also mean that Peter would receive a glorified body in the resurrection.

 

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13:37     Peter says to him, Lord, why am I not able to follow thee now? My life I will lay down for thee.

 

Peter seemed to believe that Jesus was only going into some dangerous situation, and he would gladly follow him there, even if meant his death. There was no doubt in Peter's mind but what he spoke the truth. However, when he was faced with the reality of doing so under different circumstances, his faith faltered.

 

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13:38     Jesus answered him, Thy life for me thou wilt lay down? Verily, verily, I say to thee, in no wise [the] cock will crow until thou wilt deny me thrice.

 

Jesus, who knew all too well the weaknesses of the flesh, questioned Peter's avowal of following unto the death. Jesus asked if he was quite certain, although he knew better. What a terrible burden to know how every person would react.

 

Jesus stated positively that Peter would deny him three times before the cock crowed tomorrow morning. Jesus knew what was going to transpire before sunrise the next morning.

 

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Summary Highlights of Chapter 13

 

#  In the first 12 chapters, John concentrated primarily on his public

     ministry. Now, however, the emphasis changed to the private ministry

     directed to his disciples.

 

#  Jesus came into this world to be the lamb of The God, slain from the

     foundation of the world. He knew his time on earth was limited.

 

# To better help understand this, diabolos would be the adjective,

     "dividing," with "one" added to it. Thus, the devil would be a dividing

     one. Anyone who separates, or divides, another from the purposes of

     The God, would be a devil.

 

# Man is a bipartite being, both a spiritual entity and a soulish, or fleshly,

     physical, entity.

 

# One may be dedicated to the service of The God, and thereby a spiritual

     person, or dedicated to the things of the world, and thereby a fleshly

     person. If the latter, that person would be considered a foil of the devil,

     or someone used by his fleshly, soulish nature. Judas followed his

     soulish tendencies, or his devil, to deliver Jesus up to those Jews who

     had been searching for him.

 

# What was it that kept Jesus faithful to his calling? First, Jesus knew that

     all authority in heaven and in earth had been given to him. Second,

     Jesus knew that he had been sent from the Father. Third, he also knew

     that when he left this earth, he would return to The God, and receive

     from him the authority which he had laid aside when he came to earth

     as a human being. The authority which he had experienced as Jehovah

     would again be his, without the necessity of being subject to holy spirit

     as he was while here as a man. Knowing these things gave him the

     ability to continually humble himself, even to his disciples.

 

# What Peter did not understand was that washing their feet was not just

     an act of humility. By washing the disciples feet, Jesus was

     empowering them for the spiritual walk which he expected of them.

 

# We are to walk in faith. We are also to walk with the mind of Jesus, the

     Christ. This signifies that we should walk in love and humility toward

     others. Therefore, the proper walk, signified by Jesus washing the feet

     of the disciples, would also include what one did with the hands, and

     thought with the head.

 

# "A messenger is not greater than he who sent him."  This is a startling

     statement, a double entendre. Jesus was speaking not only of their

     relationship to him as he sent them forth, but he was also stating that

     he is not greater than The God who sent him.

 

#  Jesus was always careful to clarify his standing with The God. He was a

     subjected one, and he always regarded The God as his superior. Men

     have replaced this clear distinction with their illogical doctrine of the

     trinity.

 

#  In today's religion, many are misled by preachers and evangelists into

     believing that "spiritual experiences" are the epitome of spiritual life.

     This is simply not true. We reach the apex of our spiritual lives by

     serving others in the calling we have through the gift of that portion of

     holy spirit poured out upon us.

 

# This does not mean that Judas had no choice in the matter! Again, it

     should be stated that The God requires no one to practice sin. Judas was

     chosen because the foreknowledge of The God, given to Jesus through

     holy spirit, indicated that Judas would willingly fulfill the scriptures

     because of his evil nature.

 

# Translating ean tina as "whomsoever" sounds as though Jesus would be

     sending a person, which is not the case. He will not be sending a

     person, but he will send holy spirit. Such inaccurate, misleading

     translations are related to the false doctrine of the trinity which teaches

     that holy spirit is a person. The scriptures say that holy spirit is truth.

 

# Why does Jesus state that receiving holy spirit is receiving himself?

     Because when holy spirit has come, it will take the things that are his,

     and show them unto us. That spirit will not speak of itself, but of Jesus.

 

# "He that receives me, receives him who sent me."  This refers to

     accepting the truth of the relationship between Jesus, as being the

     messiah of The God, and the truth that he was sent by The God. It has

     nothing to do with believing Jesus as a personal savior, but that he is

     the christ, or messiah. That is what people are to believe.

 

# However, satan is not capitalized in the Greek, and therefore must be

     treated as a common noun, not a name. The word satan means an

     adversary. It is used throughout the scriptures as a personification of

     mankind's evil opposition to the things of The God, and his son, Jesus.

     Therefore, what entered into Judas was not a person, but the idea of

     betraying Jesus, of being an adversary to him, for the greed of money.

 

# This was the new law of the new covenant: "that ye should love one

     another."  Quite simple? Not really! For someone to love another, they

     must make themselves vulnerable to hurt. Too many people, who walk

     in the flesh, instead of in spirit, will draw back from such a

     commitment.

 

#  Jesus chose the demonstration of "love among one another" as the

     distinguishing mark which would set his disciples apart from the

     unbelievers. This is rarely seen today in organized religious

     organizations. Why? Because the churches today are copies of secular

     organizations, subject to the same competition to be foremost as found

     in any other worldly group. Churches are seldom spiritual entities, but

     extremely carnal. Ambition, spitefulness, backbiting, and social

     climbing are the elements shown more often than the love commanded

     by Jesus.

 

# Jesus would be the first of all human beings to be resurrected with a

     glorified body. He would also be the first to ascend to the heavenly

     father.

 

 

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September 2009