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The Gospel of John: Revealing the Invisible God 

A Bible Study by Fred Kenison

 

Chapter 16


 

 

Jesus teaches of his death, resurrection and ascension

 

Summary Highlights of Chapter 16

 

 

This book is a verse-by-verse commentary.  To go to the commentary for any particular verse in Chapter 16, please click on a number below.

 

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Jesus teaches of his death, resurrection, and ascension

 

16:1     These things have I spoken to you that you may not be offended.

 

Jesus was referring to the many things (in the previous chapter) he had taught his disciples. He did not want them "to be offended."  Be offended comes from skandalizoo, which means to cause someone to stumble. Not comes from mee, the conditional not, which leaves open the possibility of the eleven disciples stumbling.

 

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16:2     They will put you out of the synagogues; but an hour is coming that everyone who kills you will think to render service to The God.

 

Condoned religious murder is nothing new. Nothing is more virulent, and more without reason, than religious fervor. From time immemorial until today, if someone disagrees with the orthodox religious views, the preferred solution is to kill those who disagree. Every religion has been guilty of this skewed logic at one time or another, and Christianity is no exception, as church history clearly testifies.

 

Persecution will begin when "they will put you out of the synagogues." Jesus also warned the 11 disciples that events would quickly escalate to the point where "everyone who kills you will think to render service to The God."  What a sad travesty that continues to this very day.

 

Jesus must have shuddered inwardly, when he looked ahead and saw these 11 men, plus one more, going forth to challenge the entrenched religion of the time. Twelve men against many thousands of people who would try to kill them in order to wipe out what they considered to be a heresy toward their god.

 

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16:3     And those things they will do to you because they know not the father nor me.

 

If ever there was an indictment of an established, hierarchical religion, this must be it. This was a reference to the leaders of the Jewish religion at the time Jesus was here on earth. Regardless of all the sacrifices and offerings being made daily in the temple at Jerusalem, Jesus denied it as being a true religion.

 

Jesus told the disciples the reason these leaders of a false religion would kill them is because "they know not the father nor me."  Both not and nor come from ouk, the absolute no. This leaves no question about the relationship these leaders had with The God and his son. There could be no stronger indictment of the Jewish leaders than this one from Jesus, himself.

 

They know not comes from ginooskoo, which means

"to learn to know, come to know, get a knowledge of...In particular ginooskoo, to become acquainted with, to know, is employed in the N.T. of the knowledge of God and Christ, and of the things relating to them or proceeding from them" ( Thayer, p. 117).

 

If Jesus came to the organized religions of today, we believe that his condemnation of their leaders would be same.

 

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16:4     But these things I have said unto you, that when may have come the hour, ye may remember them that I said [them] to you. But these things I did not say to you from [the] beginning, because I was with you.

 

Jesus told his disciples many things about their future in order "that when may have come the hour, ye may remember them that I said them to you."  People who are forewarned of persecution to come will not be as shocked by it as if they did not expect it.

 

Those who stand for the truth of the scriptures against the erroneous fabrications of organized religions may often be surprised by the aggressively adverse reaction of the religious hierarchy and many of their followers. Instead of praise for being true to the scriptures, they receive persecution. As a result, there is very little discussion today about problematic church doctrines.

 

Jesus had not said anything about this to them earlier , "because I was with you."  He was there to guide his disciples, and to comfort them at any hint of persecution. Now, however, he is broadly hinting that he will no longer be with them at the time these things "may have come."  This is written in the subjunctive aorist active, which means that it is yet a future event, which is certain to happen.

 

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16:5     But now I go to him that sent me, And none of you asks me, Where goest thou?

 

Repeatedly, throughout his ministry, Jesus informed his disciples that he was sent from his heavenly father. "Now, I go to him that sent me."  It would appear on the surface that his destination ought to be quite clear to his disciples; however, it was not. They had not yet fully grasped that there was a god beyond Jehovah. They still tended to think of Jehovah as the heavenly father. This would all become very clear to them later.

 

Jesus seemed to be astounded that "none of you asks me, Where goest thou?"  Amazing as it may seem to us, who have the knowledge of later scriptures, these disciples, although in the very presence of Jesus, did not have the knowledge we now have.

 

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16:6     But because these things I have said to you, grief has filled your heart.

 

The disciples were understandably grieved that their beloved teacher would be leaving them. They still had little cognizance of what Jesus had been telling them. How could they understand when they had never heard of anyone being resurrected? They only believed that he was leaving them to go somewhere, and they do not know where.

 

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16:7     But I say the truth to you. It is profitable for you that I should go away; for if I go not away the paraclete will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you.

 

Jesus, still trying to convince his disciples that "I say the truth to you," told them that "it is profitable for you that I should go away."  Profitable comes from sumpherei, which means that it was expedient, that there was an advantage for them.

 

As we will see, this statement further frustrated the disciples as they could not understand what Jesus was telling them. His departure would leave them stranded and alone in a hostile environment. How could this be an advantage?

 

Jesus had previously told them that "I will pray the father and he will send you another comforter, or paraclete" (see John 14:16). Now, he reassured them that "if I go not away, the paraclete will not come to you."  Jesus knew that if he fulfilled the purposes of his heavenly father while here on this earth, that he would again be given the authority to disperse holy spirit, the paraclete, as he pleased.

 

But, first, he must go to his death for the sin of all humanity. This was the requirement for his being given this authority. That was the reason that he must go away. Otherwise the holy spirit would not come to provide the support and comfort the disciples would need to fulfill their calling, and their responsibilities.

 

"But if I go, I will send him unto you."  It is unfortunate the KJV translated auton as him. Auton is not a personal pronoun, and should have been properly translated as "it."  Thayer (p. 85), defines auton as

"In itself it signifies nothing more than again, applied to what has either been previously mentioned or, when the whole discourse is looked at, must necessarily be supplied."

 

This means that this passage would have been more accurately translated as "I will send the same unto you," which would refer one back to the paraclete.

 

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16:8     And having come, he will convict the world concerning sin and concerning righteousness and concerning judgment.

 

"And having come" spoke of the paraclete, or comforter, which was still a future event. He comes from ekeinos, which is an adjective used as a pronoun. Grammatically speaking, it is a pronominal adjective, and it should have been translated as that, or the same. Its gender is masculine, and some grammarians believe this to be because of its close association with Jesus who sends it. Thus, the same would refer one back to the paraclete mentioned previously.

 

The word pneuma, or spirit, is neither male nor female; it is a neuter. Therefore, a translation of the spirit, or the paraclete, as a he is unwarranted.

 

The spirit, or paraclete, "will convict the world" of three things: sin, righteousness, and judgment. Each of these three convictions corresponds to the three-fold office of Jesus as prophet, priest, and king. Remember, the paraclete, or spirit of the truth, will

"take of mine, and show it unto you" (John 16:15).

 

Thus, the spirit will act out the offices of Jesus.

 

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16:9     Concerning sin, because they believe not on me.

 

The prophets of old often pointed out the sins of Israel. Convicted by these sins, the people would turn again to the lord. We have a conscience which witnesses to the law that its work is wrath (Romans 4:15). The spirit witnesses of the grace brought to us by Jesus, the Christ (John l:17). The conscience brings legal conviction; the spirit brings evangelical conviction. The conscience begets conviction to despair; the spirit begets conviction to hope (see II Corinthians 7:10).

 

Jesus brought a new sin into view, especially concerning the Jews to whom he had spoken (John 15:22). The sin of the Jews was not that they crucified Jesus, but that they refused to have a part in what was accomplished by that crucifixion. Now, the spirit will convict the world concerning this same matter. Unbelief in the accomplished work of Jesus at his crucifixion is the dire sin of this age (see John 3:36).

 

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16:10     Concerning righteousness because I go away to my father, and no longer ye behold me.

 

Jesus, while on this earth, was the paragon of righteousness to his disciples, and to all who heard or saw him. Now he will "go away to my father," and they would no longer behold him. Hence, the spirit will convict the world concerning righteousness in his absence.

 

This righteousness will be the same as that demonstrated by Jesus while he was a human being. He demonstrated the righteousness of The God because, when he was raised from the dead, he was the fulfillment of all the promises made to the fathers (see Acts 13:33-34).

 

The spirit will convict the world concerning righteousness because the very fact of the spirit's coming will be proof that Jesus has been enthroned at the right hand of The God. It also certifies that The God has accepted the sacrifice of Jesus.

"For by one offering he has perfected in perpetuity the sanctified. And the spirit the holy bears witness to us also: for after having said before. This is the covenant which I will covenant towards them after those days, says [the] lord: giving my laws into their hearts, also I will inscribe them into their minds. And their sins and lawlessnesses in no wise will I remember any more" (Hebrews 10:14-17).

 

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16:11     And concerning judgment because the ruler of this world has been judged.

 

As king, Jesus will have the ultimate authority of The God to judge the world. All judgment has been given to him. Jesus earlier made reference to the prince of this world (John 12:31). Recall that "the prince" represented the accumulated sins of the world which were done away with at the crucifixion. This also enables people to have no more conscience of sin (see Hebrews 10:2).

 

Hebrews 2:14-15 says,

"Since therefore the children have partaken of flesh and blood, also he [Jesus] in like manner took part in the same, that through death he might annul him who has the might of death, that is the devil."

 

In this passage, the prince of the world is identified as the devil, another acronym for the accumulated sins of the world which were done away with by the crucifixion of Jesus.

 

The conscience witnesses to the unbeliever of sin committed, of righteousness being impossible, and of impending judgment (Romans 2:15-16). The spirit witnesses to the believer of sin committed, of righteousness imputed, and of judgment accomplished (Romans 8:16). Hebrews 9:14 points out that the conscience has been cleansed. Hebrews 10:22 indicates that the spirit and conscience become one.

 

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16:12     Yet many things I have to say to you, but ye are not able to bear them now.

 

This statement is a preface for what Jesus taught next about the spirit of the truth. "Many things" refers to those things which he will teach them through holy spirit.

 

Knowing what will befall him at the hands of the Roman army, he knew that his disciples were "not able to hear them now."  After the joy of knowing his ascension, then they will have the courage to bear them, or understand them.

 

Mark 4:13 relates,

"And he says to them, Perceive ye not this parable? And how will ye know all the parables?"

 

Mark noted that Jesus was not teaching the disciples plainly in order that they could understand all that he said. He did this for the same reason as stated above: They could not bear it. Therefore, he spoke to them in parables, even as he was doing here in John.

 

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16:13     But when he, the spirit of the truth, may have come, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak from himself, but whatsoever he may hear, he will speak; and the coming things he will announce to you.

 

Again, the spirit should not have been referred to as "he" since these are not personal pronouns. May have come is written as a subjunctive, because this spirit of the truth had not yet come in the sense of which Jesus spoke.

 

The definite article precedes both spirit and truth, which means that this is the only one of its kind. "It will guide you into all truth."  This was a promise spoken only to his disciples, for the simple reason that Jesus was referring to all the previous teaching which he had given them.

 

Will guide is future tense, from odeegeesei, which means

"to show the way, the figure of a guide who introduces the traveler into an unknown country" (Rienecker, p. 254).

 

This was an apt word considering where the disciples would be traveling. They had no knowledge of what the future held for them. But, all the truth Jesus had spoken would become a living memory to them.


How will the spirit of the truth be able to do this? "It will not speak from itself, but whatsoever it may hear, it will speak."  Just as Jesus was subject to the Father, the spirit of the truth will also be subject to Jesus.

 

"And the coming things it will announce to you."  Coming things were those things still unknown to the disciples. The spirit of the truth, will essentially replace the presence of Jesus with the disciples.

 

Many people seek to take this promise to themselves, but that is a big stretch because these are things which Jesus had taught only to these disciples, not to every believer. And, this is especially not a promise to puffed-up evangelical preachers who take many things to themselves.

 

Jude 11-13 says,

"Woe to them! because in the way of Cain they went, and to the error of Balaam rushed for reward, and in the gainsaying of Korah perished. These are in your love feasts sunken rocks, feasting together with you fearlessly, being carried about, autumnal trees, without fruit, twice dead, rooted up; wild waves of the sea, foaming out their own shames; wandering stars to whom the gloom of darkness forever has been kept."

 

We should exercise great caution before considering that all the promises made to the disciples are applicable to every believer. They are not.

 

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16:14     He will glorify me, for he will receive of mine, and will announce to you.

 

Verse 16:13 pointed out three duties for the spirit of the truth. This verse adds three more. First, "he will glorify me."  Glorify comes from doxazoo, which means

"to praise, extol, magnify, celebrate, to honor, hold in honor" (Thayer, p. 157).

 

Note carefully that the word worship is not included in this definition. Jesus never held that anyone but his father should be worshiped by men.

 

Second, "he will receive of mine."  Jesus told the disciples that it was those things concerning himself which the spirit the truth would receive. Thus, everything the spirit brings to mind will glorify Jesus. And, if this be true, then it will in turn also glorify the Father, even as Jesus had previously done while here on earth.

 

Third, it will announce to you these things which are mine. The word announce means to proclaim.

 

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16:15     All things whatsoever the father has are mine; because of this I said, that of mine he will receive, and will announce to you.

 

This is a tremendous statement! Was Jesus speaking of actual ownership, or the authority to manage all things? Matthew 28:18 says,

"Jesus came to them and spake unto them, saying, All authority is given unto me in heaven and in earth."

 

Authority comes from exousia, often translated as power in the KJV, which gives a distorted view of the true meaning. Jesus is still under submission to his heavenly father. He received the authority, not the outright ownership, which remains with the Father.

 

It is the authority which was given to Jesus that the holy spirit "will announce to you."  The repetition of the words, "announce to you," gives added emphasis to the duty of holy spirit. The disciples will find their leadership under the auspices of that portion of holy spirit which will be poured out upon them. This, in turn, will require their submission to that authority.

 

This verse might be paraphrased as, "Jesus purchased this authority over all things, packaged it, and sent holy spirit to deliver it to us. Our part is to react positively to it."

 

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16:16     A little [while] and ye do not behold me; and again a little [while] and ye shall see me, because I go away to the father."

 

Today, we have the advantage of knowing about the resurrection, and this verse does not appear to be a conundrum to us. But, the disciples had no such knowledge, and this was a baffling statement to them. Jesus was speaking about future events, and yet he was not speaking clearly. They would not understand this until after his crucifixion.

 

"A little while and ye do not behold me" was a reference to his death and burial. "Again a little while and ye shall see me" referred to his resurrection, after which he would again spend time with them.

 

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16:17     Therefore some of the disciples said to one another, What is this which he says to us? A little [while] and ye do not behold me; and again a little [while] and ye shall see me? And because I go away to the father?

 

The disciples understood nothing of what Jesus had said to them. Were they stupid? No! Jesus was speaking in parables. To us who have the full revelation of his life, his message is abundantly clear. However, they had no knowledge of his resurrection from the grave, nor of the invisible god, whom Jesus constantly spoke of as "my father." Neither did they fully understand that Jesus was their god, Jehovah, in the flesh. Therefore, stupidity was not the cause for their lack of understanding.

 

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16:18     Therefore they said, What is this which he says, the little [while]? We do not know what he speaks.

 

Their final conclusion was that "We do not know what he speaks."  They were thinking in terms of the flesh, while Jesus was attempting to teach them about spiritual matters. They would not know until holy spirit arrived.

 

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16:19     Therefore Jesus knew that they desired to ask him, and said to them, Concerning this do ye inquire among one another, that I said, A little [while] and ye do not behold me; and again a little [while] and ye shall see me?

 

Jesus knew what the disciples were discussing among themselves. Therefore, he openly questioned them about the two questions which had to do with his burial and his resurrection. But, again, he spoke to them in an allegory. Why did he do this? The answer was given when Jesus told them that "I have many things yet to share with you, but you cannot bear them now."

 

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16:20     Verily, verily, I say to you that ye will weep and will lament, but the world will rejoice; but ye will be grieved, but your grief shall become to joy.

 

These two comments parallel the two questions which the disciples were mulling in their minds. First, Jesus said, "ye will weep and will lament." This would be in regard to his death and burial.

 

"But the world will rejoice."  The ungodly, or the unbelievers, of this world will rejoice, or will feel great joy when he is dead. In context, Jesus was including the Jewish leaders as those of the world. They did not know him, and thus they did not know The God either.

 

The spiritual leaders of the Jewish religion were considered to be part of the world. This is also true of many religious leaders today. They know nothing of Jesus as the coming glorified king to rule and reign over this earth. Too many believe that the kingdom of God is "within you."  They do not have a clue about the reality of the coming kingdom.

 

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16:21     The woman, when she gives birth, has grief, because her hour is come; but when she brings forth the child, she no longer remembers the tribulation, on account of the joy that a man has been born into the world.

 

This was a quote from Isaiah 26:17, which says,

"Like as a woman with child, that draweth near the time of her delivery is in pain, and crieth out in her pangs; so have we been in thy sight, O lord."

 

This was Isaiah's plaintive cry about the condition of the nation of Israel in his day. The Israelites endured many hardships brought upon them in order to drive them back to the lord.

 

Jesus drew a parallel between the time of grief and the time of joy. The disciples would experience grief when he was crucified. Their grief will turn to joy when he appears to them in his resurrected body.

 

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16:22     And therefore ye indeed now have grief; but again I will see you, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no one takes from you.

 

Jesus was referring back to his previous allegory, equating the situation of the disciples with that of a woman giving birth. "But again I will see you and your heart will rejoice."  This is equal to his previous statement that a woman, once the child appears, forgets her previous travail and rejoices because the child has been born. Because Jesus did not want them to fully understand, he was still using allegories.

 

"Your joy no one takes from you."  Nothing which would happen to them in the future, no matter how dire the circumstances, will be able to remove their joy at seeing him again. That joy will stay with them right up to their last breath. What a promise!

 

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16:23     And in that day ye shall ask nothing of me. Verily verily, I say to you, That whatsoever ye may ask the father in my name, he will give you.

 

Verse 14:20 related that Jesus had told them "in that day you will know that I am in the father, and the father in me."  This was a manner of speaking that regarded the close relationship between the Father and Jesus. "In that day," of course, was speaking of that time when "they see him again."  That will be after he resumes his role as mediator between men and The God.

 

Up until now, Jesus had been the one to whom the disciples had gone for their every need. That was the usual manner of those who were followers of a teacher who led them about. But, that will change in the future. They will be looking to another for their needs. And who might that be? "Whatsoever ye may ask the father, in my name, he will give you."

 

Note carefully the condition which Jesus attached to this promise. Whatsoever they ask the Father must be asked, "in my name."  This does not mean to simply tack the phrase "in Jesus' name" to the end of a prayer. The meaning goes far beyond what most followers usually understand.

 

In the name of Jesus means that what is asked for is to not only glorify Jesus, but also to glorify the Father. It is something asked for that will help fulfill their purposes. Again, it should be pointed out that Jesus drew a clear line between himself and his heavenly father. He is subordinate to The God in his ministry.

 

Jesus, even in a resurrected body, still has the ministry of bringing glory to his heavenly father. Nothing has changed for him. But, his relationship with his disciples has been turned upside down. They must now look beyond him to The God, and understand that he (Jesus) will be the mediator, not the provider.

 

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16:24     Hitherto ye asked nothing in my name: ask, and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full.

 

Again, a warning should be posted that these promises were made only to the 11 disciples. Great caution must be taken when anyone claims that these promises are for all believers. That actually places a burden upon people that few, if any, are equipped to bear. However, there are some preachers who claim that they have been given such a privilege, and that everyone in their congregation should also be subject to this promise.

 

Hitherto, or up until now, "ye asked nothing in my name."  Of course not. They had looked to Jesus as the provider, and they had no thought of going beyond him. Did they not believe that he was the messiah? Now, however, they were told that they were to look beyond him to "his father," whom they knew nothing about.

 

The purpose for asking, Jesus said, was "that your joy may be full."  Their joy would come with the privilege of knowing full well that everything they asked of the Father, in the name of Jesus, would be forth coming.

 

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16:25     These things I have spoken to you in allegories, but an hour is coming when I will no longer speak in allegories to you, but I will announce plainly to you concerning the father.

 

Allegories are different than parables. A parable is a teaching which has a truth "running alongside," a simple story illustrating a moral or religious lesson. The parable, itself, is only the means to demonstrate this truth. An allegory is a symbolic representation using similes, comparisons, or metaphors to express truths or generalizations about human existence. (Heritage).

 

An allegory, according to Thayer ( p. 490) is

"a saying out of the usual course or deviating from the usual manner of speaking. Speech or discourse in which a thing is illustrated by the use of similes and comparisons; an allegory, i.e., extended and elaborate metaphor."

 

Jesus promised the disciples that "an hour is coming when I will no longer speak in allegories to you."  He further promised that he would "announce plainly to you concerning the father."

 

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16:26     In that day ye shall ask in my name; and I say not to you that I will beseech the father for you.

 

"That day" was a reference to the time after his resurrection. Then, the disciples "shall ask in my name."  Now, however, Jesus changed the format. Where before he said that he would ask the Father for what they wished, or prayed for, he now stated that "I say not that I will beseech the father for you."  It would no longer be necessary for Jesus to "beseech the father."  The Father, or The God, would answer their prayer without such intervention from Jesus.

 

Please keep in mind that this is another promise made only to those few disciples present. Is it the same for believers today? Possibly, if they are as dedicated to the cause of bringing glory to the heavenly father as were those few disciples.

 

Too often, such promises are taken out of context by ignorant preachers, and hung around the neck of believers like a dead albatross. These things can become a burden, and create bondage for unsuspecting believers which they should not have to bear.

 

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16:27     For the father himself loves you, because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from The God.

 

Love comes from phileo, the love which is based upon emotion, rather than the general good. This is that love which describes a relationship between people who are close to one another, such as family members, or close friends.

 

Why does the Father himself love you? "Because ye have loved me, and have believed that I came out from The God."  Loved and believed are both written in the perfect tense. This means that such love and believing have become a constant way of life for these disciples. And, because it is written in the perfect tense, it also signifies that the effects of such love and believing will continue into the future, after the departure of Jesus.

 

These disciples, at least, believed that Jesus had come out from The God. They had accepted Jesus' oft made statement that he had been sent from the Father, or, that he had come forth from the Father. These were the few out of the many who had done so, and because of this they were loved of the Father.

 

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16:28     I came out from the father and have come into the world; again I leave the world and go to the father.

 

This was plain speech. The disciples had already stated that they believed that Jesus came out from the Father and into the world. It should be noted, however, that they did not fully understand the mystery surrounding his coming. That mystery is one of the most profound in all the scriptures.

 

These disciples accepted Jesus as being messiah, but they had no recognition of the further truth surrounding his coming. They had no inkling that Jesus was their god, Jehovah, who had become flesh. Jehovah, the word of the invisible god in the Old Testament, had become Jesus, the word of The God in the New Testament.

 

Hebrews 1:1-2 says,

"In many parts and in many ways of old The God having spoken to the fathers in the prophets, in these last days spoke to us in a son, whom he appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds."

 

Indeed, Jesus came out from the Father exactly as he had said. This was witnessed to by the writer of Hebrews.

 

Jesus also said, "again I leave the world, and go to the father."  He had spoken such truth to the disciples before, but always in the form of an allegory. Therefore, they were continually mystified as to what he meant. However, he would not leave them continually bewildered by his teachings after his departure to the Father.

 

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16:29     His disciples say to him, Lo, now thou speakest plainly, and speakest no allegory.

 

At the least, Jesus wanted his disciples to understand where he had come from and where he was going. Therefore, he spoke plainly to them. Although this was the simple truth, there was still much that the disciples did not understand about this statement. It sounded simple enough, but they, unlike us, did not have the ability to look backward from a future event.

 

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16:30     Now we know that thou knowest all things, and hast not need that anyone should ask thee. By this we believe that thou camest forth from god.

 

If Jesus knew that the Father was going to answer their every request that was asked to glorify himself, or asked in his name, then there must be nothing which he did not know. And, "because by this we believe that thou camest forth from god."  This simple statement proves exactly how differing are the reasons that people may have for believing Jesus is the messiah.

 

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16:31     Jesus answered them, Now do ye believe?

 

Jesus answered their assertion of faith with a question. This would seem to leave the question of their faith "up in the air," so to speak. Did he accept their avowal of faith at face value, or did he still question?

 

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16:32     Lo, is coming an hour, and now has come, that ye will be scattered each to his own, and ye will leave me alone. And yet, I am not alone, for the father is with me.

 

The words, "Is coming an hour, and now has come" is a manner of speech which has no equal in the English language. This is because the Greek has two kinds of time, both of which are demonstrated here, while the English only has one. There is chronological time, and qualitative time in the Greek. Therefore, an event may be spoken of as coming, and also as now has come.

 

This portion of the verse also contains what is spoken of grammatically as a prolepsis. A prolepsis indicates an event as now present when it is still in the future.

 

"Ye will be scattered each to his own [house]."  This was not true at the present chronological time, but it was so certain to occur that Jesus said it "now has come."  He was speaking of the time when he would be taken by the soldiers for his trial and crucifixion. At that time "ye will leave me alone."

 

Jesus then corrected himself by adding a qualifying statement, "Yet, I am not alone, for the father is with me."  This leads one to wonder whether Jesus realized that while he was bearing the sins of the world upon the cross, that even his Father would leave him alone for awhile.

 

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16:33     These things have I spoken to you that ye may have peace. In the world ye have tribulation; but be of good courage, I have overcome the world.

 

Jesus had spoken so much with his disciples "that ye may have peace."  He did not want them to react in such a manner as to lose their peace.

 

He again warned them of coming events. "In the world ye have tribulation."  The peace he wished for them did not exclude tribulation, or troubles. Often, those who ask Jesus to become their "personal savior" are assured that this act will keep them from future troubles in their lives. Jesus, however, told his disciples to expect the opposite.

 

He also said, "be courageous, I have overcome the world."  He has overcome, or conquered the world. This is written in the perfect tense, which shows that something has come to a conclusion, but the effects continue on. Again, Jesus was using the prolepsis grammatical form. He had not yet overcome the world by his death, but it was so certain to happen that he told the disciples he had already overcome the world.

 

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Summary Highlights of Chapter 16

 

# Condoned religious murder is nothing new. Nothing is more virulent,

     and more without reason, than religious fervor. From time immemorial

     until today, if someone disagrees with the orthodox religious views, the

     preferred solution is to kill those who disagree. Every religion has been

     guilty of this skewed logic at one time or another, and Christianity is

     no exception, as church history clearly testifies.

 

# Regardless of all the sacrifices and offerings being made daily in the

     temple at Jerusalem, Jesus denied the Jewish religion of his day as being

     a true religion. If Jesus came to the organized religions of today, we

     believe that his condemnation of their leaders would be same.

 

# People who are forewarned of persecution to come will not be as

     shocked by it as if they did not expect it.

 

# Those who stand for the truth of the scriptures against the erroneous

     fabrications of organized religions may often be surprised by the

     aggressively adverse reaction of the religious hierarchy and many of

     their followers.

 

# The disciples had not yet fully grasped that there was a god beyond

     Jehovah. They still tended to think of Jehovah as the heavenly father.

     This would all become very clear to them later.

 

#  Jesus knew that if he fulfilled the purposes of his heavenly father while

     here on this earth, that he would again be given the authority to

     disperse holy spirit, the paraclete, as he pleased.

 

# The word pneuma, or spirit, is neither male nor female; it is a neuter.

     Therefore, a translation of the spirit, or the paraclete, as a he is

     unwarranted.

 

# The spirit, or paraclete, "will convict the world" of three things: sin,

     righteousness, and judgment. Each of these three convictions

     corresponds to the three-fold office of Jesus as prophet, priest, and king.

     Thus, the spirit will act out the offices of Jesus.

 

# The sin of the Jews was not that they crucified Jesus, but that they

     refused to have a part in what was accomplished by that crucifixion.

     Now, the spirit will convict the world concerning this same matter.

     Unbelief in the accomplished work of Jesus at his crucifixion is the dire

     sin of this age (see John 3:36).

 

#  Jesus demonstrated the righteousness of The God because, when he was

     raised from the dead, he was the fulfillment of all the promises made to

     the fathers (see Acts 13:33-34).

 

# As king, Jesus will have the ultimate authority of The God to judge the

     world.

 

#  Jesus was not teaching the disciples plainly in order that they could

     understand all that he said. He did this because they could not bear it.

     Therefore, he spoke to them in parables.

 

#  Just as Jesus was subject to the Father, the spirit of the truth will also be

     subject to Jesus.

 

# We should exercise great caution before considering that all the

     promises made to the disciples are applicable to every believer. They

     are not.

 

#  Jesus is still under submission to his heavenly father. He received the

     authority, not the outright ownership, which remains with the Father.

     It is the authority which was given to Jesus that the holy spirit "will

     announce to you."

 

# This verse (16:15) might be paraphrased as, "Jesus purchased this

     authority over all things, packaged it, and sent holy spirit to deliver it

     to us. Our part is to react positively to it."

 

#  Too many believe that the kingdom of God is "within you."  They do

     not have a clue about the reality of the coming kingdom.

 

# Whatsoever they ask the Father must be asked, "in my name."  This

     does not mean to simply tack the phrase "in Jesus' name" to the end of

     a prayer. The meaning goes far beyond what most followers usually

     understand. In the name of Jesus means that what is asked for is to not

     only glorify Jesus, but also to glorify the Father. It is something asked

     for that will help fulfill their purposes.

 

# Great caution must be taken when anyone claims that these promises

     are for all believers. That actually places a burden upon people that

     few, if any, are equipped to bear.

 

# Allegories are different than parables. A parable is a teaching which has

     a truth "running alongside," a simple story illustrating a moral or

     religious lesson. The parable, itself, is only the means to demonstrate

     this truth. An allegory is a symbolic representation using similes,

     comparisons, or metaphors to express truths or generalizations about

     human existence.

 

# Too often, such promises are taken out of context by ignorant

     preachers, and hung around the neck of believers like a dead albatross.

     These things can become a burden, and create bondage for

     unsuspecting believers which they should not have to bear.

 

# This was plain speech. The disciples had already stated that they

     believed that Jesus came out from the Father and into the world. It

     should be noted, however, that they did not fully understand the

     mystery surrounding his coming. That mystery is one of the most

     profound in all the scriptures.

 

# These disciples accepted Jesus as being messiah, but they had no

     recognition of the further truth surrounding his coming. They had no

     inkling that Jesus was their god, Jehovah, who had become flesh.

     Jehovah, the word of the invisible god in the Old Testament, had

     become Jesus, the word of The God in the New Testament.

 

# The words, "Is coming an hour, and now has come" is a manner of

     speech which has no equal in the English language. This is because the

     Greek has two kinds of time, both of which are demonstrated here,

     while the English only has one. There is chronological time, and

     qualitative time in the Greek. Therefore, an event may be spoken of as

     coming, and also as now has come.

 

# This portion of the verse also contains what is spoken of grammatically

     as a prolepsis. A prolepsis indicates an event as now present when it is

     still in the future.

 

# The peace he wished for them did not exclude tribulation, or troubles.

     Often, those who ask Jesus to become their "personal savior" are

     assured that this act will keep them from future troubles in their lives.

     Jesus, however, told his disciples to expect the opposite.

 

 

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October 2009