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The No-Name God

A Bible Study by Fred Kenison

 

10  The “Us” and “Our” Gods of

       Genesis


Linking Jehovah and Jesus

 

 

The creation of Jehovah

Comments on Leviticus: sacrifices and offerings

Burnt offerings

The priesthood

 

Summary Highlights of Chapter 10

Attributes shared by Jehovah and Jesus

 

 

In this chapter, we bridge the gap between the Old Testament and the New Testament.  We will examine many scriptures which reveal that Jesus, the man, in the New Testament, also had many of the same attributes as did Jehovah, the god of Israel, in the Old Testament.

 

 

The creation of Jehovah

 

The first chapter of Genesis states that "a god" created the earth and everything on it, including man. In Genesis 1:26 this "a god" used the words "us" and "our," which brings up the question of what other god was there to be included in the plural? After Genesis 2:4, the god described is the one designated as Jehovah. Therefore, it must be Jehovah who is the other god referred to by the use of the plural pronouns.

 

However, this raises another question. Is Jehovah the "a god" who created heaven and earth and all things therein? It is commonly acceded that the "a god" who created all these things was the god without any beginning or end. Isaiah 43:10 says that,

"You are my witnesses, says Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), and my servant whom I have chosen, that you may know and believe me, and understand that I [am] he; before me no god was formed, nor shall there be after me."

 

Note carefully the word "formed," which means put in a mold or squeezed into shape. This is not consistent with the god who had no beginning nor end. The implication here is that Jehovah was formed, or created. If this is true, then who created the god, Jehovah?  The "other" god referred to in Genesis 1:26 was clearly Jehovah, the god of Israel.  However, the god of Israel could not be the god mentioned in Genesis 1:1 who created the heavens and the earth.

 

After the early part of Genesis, when people spoke of their god, it was in reference to Jehovah, not the god who had no beginning nor end. They considered Jehovah to be the first cause of everything they saw. They did not have the light of further revelation in the New Testament. Therefore, they credited the creation to Jehovah. They were wrong, but only partially wrong.

 

There will be many who claim our statements here are outlandish, blasphemous, heretical, even unscriptural. However, the plain truth of scripture points to two separate gods, and not the "three persons" of an illogical trinity. There was the "a god" which created heaven and earth.  Then, there was a god, Jehovah, the god of Israel, who was formed by this "a god."  Both gods were separate entities.

 

This point was clearly revealed in the New Testament scriptures. For instance, Colossians 1:12-17 says,

"Giving thanks to the father, who made us competent for the share of the inheritance of the saints in the light; who delivered us from the authority of darkness, and translated [us] into the kingdom of the love of his son; in whom we have redemption through his blood, the remission of sins; who is [the] image of the god (tou theos), the invisible, firstborn of all creation; because by him were created all things, the things in the heavens and the things upon the earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones, or lordships, or principalities, or authorities: all things have been created by him and for him. And he is before all, and all things subsist in him."

 

This was spoken about Jesus. He was the image of the invisible god, the firstborn of all creation. This is both a father and a son; not one, but two.

 

As we will prove later, Jesus, the son of the New Testament, was also Jehovah, the god of Israel, in the Old Testament. Jehovah (or Jesus) was the "other" god, the second god, the firstborn of all creation. He was the only god formed, and there was no other god formed. The scriptures clearly teach two separate gods, not three persons in one god.

 

Revelation 3:14 sheds further light on this point.

"And to the angel of the assembly of [the] Laodiceans write: These things says the Amen, the witness faithful and true, the beginning of the creation of the god."

 

The faithful witness is Jesus, the beginning (firstborn) of creation, formed in the image of the invisible god.

 

This raises the question. When was this "beginning of the creation of the god" created? The above scripture clearly states that nothing was created before this "Amen," whom we know as Jesus. But, this beginning was not always known as Jesus. In fact, the man we call Jesus was not known until he was born of the virgin, Mary, which was when he came into existence.

 

Therefore, the answer for our question must be a bit more complex.

Our search continues by quoting John 1:1:

"In [the] beginning was the word, and the word was with the god, and the word was a god."

 

A key word here is "beginning."  What beginning? If it was the beginning of creation, then Genesis 1:1 certainly applies. "In the beginning (a) god created the heaven and the earth."  Although the heaven and earth were also created in the beginning, the scriptures state that they were not created first. It was Jehovah who was created first.

 

Genesis 1:3 declares,

"And (a) god said, Let there be light; and there was light."

 

This is the first recorded mention of The God speaking. Simply because The God spoke, the word, or the logos, was the first creation in the beginning of all creation.

 

Thayer (p. 380) says,

"A word but not in the grammatical sense (the mere name of an object), but language, vox, i.e., a word which uttered by a living voice embodies a conception or idea."

 

And, Thayer continues (pp. 381-382),

"In several passages in the writing of John, ha logos, denotes the essential Word of God, i.e., the personal (hypostatic) wisdom and power in union with God, his minister in the creation and government of the universe, the cause of all the world’s life both physical and ethical, which for the procurement of man’s salvation put on human nature in the person of Jesus the Messiah and shone forth conspicuously from his words and deeds."

 

It was this latter definition of the word which constituted Jehovah, the god of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, David, and Israel. As Thayer noted, it was this first creation, the word, who was The God’s "minister in the creation and government of the universe, the cause of all the world’s life both physical and ethical" and who became human in the person of Jesus.

 

Now that we have established that the word was the first creation of The God, let us return to John 1:1: "the word was with (the) god."  Although the KJV translators ignored it, the definite article preceding "god" is in the Greek manuscript. That clearly indicates that this is the invisible creator god.

 

The word translated with comes from pros, which means face-to-face, or in close communion with someone. Therefore, the word was a separate entity from The God.

 

An example may help to clarify this issue of separate entities. When we speak, our words become separate from us. Once spoken, those words take on a life of their own. They are an expression of the speaker, but they now belong to all who hear them.

 

In John 8:42:

"Therefore, Jesus said to them, If the god were father of you, ye would have loved me, for I came forth from the god and am come; for neither of myself have I come, but he sent me."

 

Jesus came from the Father, or The God, as his expression, or word. The God sent him as a self-revelation of his love for mankind.

 

The final clause in John 1:1 says, "and the word was a god."  The KJV messed up the translation of this phrase by saying, "and the Word was God."   The result is that this verse is often used to "prove" that Jesus and The God are one, two parts of the "trinity."  However, that is not what this verse says.

 

In this case, John 1:1, there is no definite article preceding theos, god, which is a crucial point. According to the grammatical rules concerning a renewed mention, if the "god" in this part of the verse were meant to be the same "god" mentioned earlier in the verse, then the definite article would be required.

 

This grammatical rule was followed earlier in the verse: "In the beginning was the word, and the word was with the god."  When "word" was repeated, and the author wanted to signify that it was the same "word" mentioned before, he used the definite article. However, the author did not use the definite article with the renewed mention of "god" as he would have done if he wanted to indicate that it was the same "god" that had been mentioned earlier. Therefore, this latter part of John 1:1 should read, "and the word was a god." 

 

Given all this, we can now understand John 1:1.  The God, the invisible god of creation, spoke a god, Jehovah, into existence. Jehovah was the word of the Old Testament, and he was the constant spokesman for The God. The Israelites were not even aware that The God existed. They saw the instrument of The God, Jehovah, and designated that instrument, or logos, or word, or Jehovah, as the god of Israel.

 

This interpretation is entirely consistent with the Old Testament. The word was a god. Jehovah was the word, and Jehovah, a god, was the god of Israel. This is not the terrible statement some claim it to be.

 

The word god, elohim, is a generic term, not a proper name, and it does not always refer to The God which believers are supposed to worship. The distinguishing mark that differentiates one god from another god is the definite article. This sets The God apart as the revealed god of the Bible, unless, of course, it precedes a renewed mention of a god.

 

John 1:3 states specifically how the instrument, or word, or Jehovah, was used by the invisible god of creation. The God spoke his desires, and Jehovah responded by turning those desires into reality.

"All things came into being through him, and without him not even one thing came into being which has come into being."

 

We know that Jehovah was present at the creation because the invisible god spoke him into being as he said, "let there be light."  John 1:14 adds more information about what happened to Jehovah, the word in the Old Testament.

"And the word became flesh, and tabernacled among us, and we discerned his glory, a glory as of an only-begotten with a father, full of grace and truth."

 

It was Jehovah, the word of the Old Testament, who became Jesus, the word of the New Testament.

 

The word flesh comes from sarx, which means that Jesus had the same flesh, or the same tendency toward sin, as any other man. Hebrews 2:14 reinforces this point.

"Therefore, since the children have partaken of flesh and blood, also he in like manner took part in the same, that through death he might annul him who has the might of the death, that is, the devil."

 

From this trail of scriptures, we have learned several things.  First, Jehovah was a created god. He was not without beginning or end, as is the invisible god.  Second, Jehovah was the word of the invisible god.  Third, Jehovah, the word, the god of Israel, became Jesus, a man of flesh and blood.

 

We have also answered the question posed earlier. The "us" and "our" of Genesis refers to the invisible god and Jehovah, his word, which are two separate entities.

 

This is only the first attribute found in our study of the Old Testament scriptures which relates to the Jesus of the New Testament.

 

The next attribute is found in Genesis 2:7:

"Then Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) god (‘elohiym:H430) formed man of the dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being."

 

The man formed was Adam. John 1:4 says that,

"In him was life; and the life was the light of men."

 

The "him" of this verse is the word mentioned earlier, or Jehovah. Just as Jehovah gave life in the Old Testament, Jesus also bestowed life in the New Testament.

 

Genesis 4:3-4 says that Cain and Abel brought offerings before Jehovah.

"(And it was) in the course of time, Cain brought of the fruit of the ground an offering to Yahweh (yehovah:H3068). And Abel, (also he) brought of the firstlings of his flock and of their fat portions."

 

Hebrews 13:15 says of Jesus,

"By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to the god continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name."

 

The people of the Old Testament had no idea they were offering their sacrifices to the invisible god, through Jehovah.

 

The New Testament shows that The God still desires a sacrifice from men, but now it is a sacrifice of praise.  And, this current sacrifice is offered through the New Testament Jehovah, whom we know as Jesus, the Christ.

 

Genesis 6:5-7 declares that because of men’s evil ways, Jehovah decided to destroy all men except Noah.

"Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) saw the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart [was] only evil continually. And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) was sorry that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. So Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) said, I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the ground: man, and beast, and creeping things, and birds of the air, for I am sorry that I have made them. But Noah found favor in the eyes of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068)."

 

Jehovah subsequently judged all men by covering the earth with a flood. John 5:22 points out that Jesus, the New Testament Jehovah, has been given all judgment over men.

"For the Father judges no man, but has given all judgment to the Son."

 

Genesis 12:1 says that Jehovah told Abram to leave his kindred and country; that Jehovah would lead him to a new land.

"Now Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) said to Abram, Go from your country, and your kindred, and your father's house, to the land that I will show you."

 

The prophecy of Zacharias, Luke 1:79, said that the one sent from The God would,

"...shine upon those in darkness and sitting in the shadow of death, to direct our feet into the way of peace."

 

Jesus, the New Testament Jehovah, is still guiding his people in this age.

 

Genesis 14:18-22 states that Abraham identified Melchizedek’s el, or god, as being Jehovah.

"And Melchizedek, king of Salem, brought out bread and wine, (and) he was the priest of god (‘el:H410) most high. And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Abram by god (‘el:H410) most high, maker of heaven and earth; and blessed be god (‘el:H410) most high, who has delivered your enemies into your hand. And he gave to him a tenth of everything. And the king of Sodom said to Abram, Give me the persons, but take the goods for yourself. But Abram said to the king of Sodom, I have lifted my hand (I have sworn) to Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), the most high god (‘el:H410), maker of heaven and earth."

 

Hebrews 5:6 identifies Jesus as,

"...a priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedec."

 

Genesis 15:1 points out how Abraham learned that Jehovah was his lord and master, or the one who was his shield and great rewarder.

"After these things, the word of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) came to Abram in the vision (saying), Fear not, Abram. I am your shield, your very great reward."

 

Romans 10:12 says about Jesus,

"...the same lord (kurios:G2962) of all [is] rich toward all that call upon him."

 

The word kyrios, lord, in the New Testament is the equivalent of the word adonai, lord, in the Old Testament.

 

This next verse presents quite an interesting thought and one that is often misunderstood. Genesis 17:1 reveals that Jehovah is the almighty god, or god almighty.

"When Abram was ninety years and nine years, Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) appeared to Abram, and said to him, I am the god (‘el:H410) almighty (shadday:H7706); walk before me and be blameless."

 

In II Corinthians 6:16-18, The God says that he will dwell among them and will be their god, and they shall be to me a people.

"And what agreement a temple of god with idols? Ye are the living for a temple of god; according as the god said, I will dwell among them, and walk among them, and I will be their god, and they shall be to me a people. Wherefore, come out from the midst of them and be separated, says the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing, and I will receive you, and will be to you for a father, and ye shall be to me for sons and daughters, says the lord almighty."

 

The scriptures clearly show that Jehovah was god almighty in the Old Testament, while it is Jesus who is lord, or god almighty, in the New Testament. Do not make the common mistake of believing that the words "god almighty" always refer to the invisible god who is the first cause of all things. The words "god almighty" usually refer to either Jehovah or Jesus.

 

Genesis 18:2, describing the time when Jehovah and the two angels visited Abraham, said that he saw all three as men.

"He lifted up his eyes and looked, and, behold, three men stood in front of him. When he saw them, he ran to meet them from the door of the tent, and bowed himself to the earth."

 

Sarah then prepared a meal for them and they ate. This was one of Jehovah’s greatest manifestations in the Old Testament. It also foreshadowed the time when Jehovah would no longer be a spiritual being, but a man of flesh and blood.

 

Mark 9:2-4 notes,

"And after six days Jesus takes with him Peter, and James, and John, and brings them into a high mountain alone apart. And he was transfigured before them; and his garments became shining, exceeding white as snow, such as no fuller on the earth is not able to whiten. And appeared to them Elias with Moses, and they were talking with Jesus."

 

Just as he appeared to Abraham as an ordinary person, Jehovah, now as Jesus, appeared to some of his disciples in a glorified body which he assumed again after his resurrection from the grave. This must have been a trying experience. Could they believe what they had seen? Was their faith great enough?

 

Luke 7:6- 9 says,

"And Jesus went with them; but he already being not far distant from the house, the centurion sent friends to him, saying, Lord, trouble not (thyself), for I am not worthy that thou shouldest come under my roof; wherefore, neither I myself counted worthy to come to thee; but say a word, and my servant shall be healed. For I also am appointed a man under authority, having soldiers under myself. And I say to this (one), Go, and he goes; and to another, Come, and he comes; and to my bondsman, Do this, and he does (it). And having heard these things, Jesus wondered at him; and turning to the crowd following him, said, I say to you, not even in Israel did I find so great faith."

 

Note particularly that this centurion was indeed a remarkable man. First, he recognized that Jesus was a man. Second, he recognized that Jesus was under the authority of another. Third, he believed that Jesus could heal his servant simply by speaking. This centurion recognized Jesus for who he was, the messiah, the christ of The God. No wonder Jesus wondered at him, and said, "I say to you, not even in Israel did I find so great faith."

 

John, the Baptist, was another person who recognized the reality of Jesus. John 1:30-31 says,

"He it is concerning whom I said, After me comes a man, who has precedence of me, because he was before me, and I knew him not; but that he might be manifested to Israel, therefore, I came with water baptizing."

 

Since John, the Baptist, was six months older than Jesus, what did he mean when he said, "he was before me?"  He knew in some manner that Jesus had an existence before the one he now had. This must have tried John’s faith, but still John believed.

 

Jesus once said to some believing Jews,

"Therefore, Jesus said to the Jews who had believed on him, If ye abide in my word, truly, ye are my disciples, and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free." (John 8:31-32).

 

They could not understand, and began to argue. Jesus said to them,

"But now ye seek to kill me, a man who has spoken the truth to you, which I heard from the god: this Abraham did not." (John 8:40).

 

Here, Jesus not only said that he was a man, but that he had heard the truth from The God, which was not true of Abraham.

 

Jehovah extended the covenant from Abraham to Isaac (Genesis 26:24), thereby showing that he is truthful and faithful to his word. Jehovah also promised Isaac that,

"as I was with Moses, so I will be with you; I will not fail you or forsake you." (Joshua 1:5).

 

Hebrews 13:5-6 quotes this passage from Joshua:

"(Let your) manner of life be without money, satisfied with present (circumstances), for he has said, In no wise will I leave thee, nor in any wise will I forsake thee. So that we may boldly say, The lord (is) a helper to me, and I will not be afraid: what shall man do to me?"

 

The statement was attributed to Jehovah in the Old Testament, but also to Jesus in the New Testament, thereby equating the two.

 

Exodus 6:6-7 says,

"Therefore, say to the people of Israel, I am Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from their bondage, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm, and with great acts of judgment. And I will take you (to me) for my people, and I will be (to you) your god (‘elohiym:H430), and you shall know that I [am] Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), your god (‘elohiym:H430), who has brought you from under the burdens of the Egyptians. And I will bring you into the land which I swore (lifted up my hand) to give (it) to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. I will give it you for a possession: I am Yahweh (yehovah:H3068)."

 

I Corinthians 3:21-22 also speaks of people being provided for.

"Therefore let no man glory in men. For all things are yours; Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or (the) world, or life, or death, or present things, or coming things; all are yours; and ye Christ’s, and Christ the god’s."

 

Again, it was Jesus speaking in the New Testament, and Jehovah in the Old Testament, yet both promising the same thing.

 

Galatians 3:28-29 also speaks of the lord’s provision for his people.

"There is not Jew nor Greek, there is not bondman nor free, there is not male and female: for all ye are one in Christ Jesus. But if ye (are) Christ's, then ye are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to promise."

 

All are one in Christ Jesus, meaning all are there judicially because of his crucifixion, and because of what was done for all by grace, all are also heirs. However, not all spend their inheritance wisely, as witnessed to by the prodigal son who wasted his (see Luke 16:11-16).

 

John also presents an interesting foreshadowing of how Jesus regarded people in his own day, and how it caused him trouble with the Jews.

 

Exodus 7:1 pointed out that Jehovah spoke through Moses, who spoke through Aaron to Pharaoh.

"And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) said to Moses, See, I make you a god (‘elohiym:H430) to Pharaoh, and Aaron your brother shall be your prophet. You shall speak all that I command you, and Aaron your brother shall tell Pharaoh to let go (send) the people of Israel out of his land."

 

Moses was a god to Pharaoh. Jesus referred to these words when he spoke to the Jews.

"Jesus answered them, Many good works I showed you from my father; because of which of them do ye stone me? The Jews answered him, saying, For a good work we do not stone thee, but for blasphemy, and because thou, being a man, makest thyself god. Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, gods ye are? If he called them gods, to whom the word of the god came, (and the scripture cannot be broken), (of him) whom the father sanctified and sent into the world, do ye say, Thou blasphemest, because I said I am son of the god?" (John 10:32-36).

 

Moses, a man, was a god to Pharaoh. Therefore, as a man, Jesus could speak as a god, operating under the authority of The God.

 

Jehovah demonstrated that salvation came from him when he opened the Red Sea so the Israelites could escape the Egyptian army (Exodus 14:13-14).  In the New Testament, salvation was extended to the population of the whole world (John 1:29), not just one nation.

 

In Exodus, people escaped with their physical lives from Egypt, which often symbolizes sin. In John, the lamb of The God took away the sin of the world in such a manner that it will neither be imputed nor punished (John 1:29).

 

Jehovah saved physically in the Old Testament, and Jesus saved spiritually in the New Testament. The apostle John seemed unable to let this great precept pass by lightly. In his first letter (I John 2:1-2), he reinforced what he had said earlier in his gospel.

"My little children, these things write I to you, that ye may not sin; and if anyone should sin, we have a paraclete with the father, Jesus (the) righteous christ; and he is (the) propitiation for our sins; but not only for ours, but also for the whole world."

 

Another parallel between the Jehovah of the Old Testament and the Jehovah (Jesus) of the New Testament is found in Exodus and Acts. Exodus 19:3-6 says that Jehovah desired a nation of priests and appointed Israel to be that nation.

 

Acts 2:16-17, a complementary passage to Exodus, says,

"But this is that which has been spoken by the prophet Joel: And it shall be in the last days, says the god, I will pour out of my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your elders shall dream dreams."

 

When someone was appointed to the priesthood, they were given a portion of holy spirit to fit them for the office. This was still true in the New Testament, which is why Jesus sent the holy spirit. The result is described in I Peter 2:9-10:

"But ye are a chosen race, a kingly priesthood, a holy nation, a people for a possession, that ye might set forth the virtues of him who called you out of darkness to his wonderful light; who (were) not a people, but now (are) god’s people; who had not received mercy, but now received mercy."

 

Jehovah gave holy spirit to those he appointed to be priests, and Jesus poured out holy spirit upon everyone. Many, especially in the charismatic community, are still looking for holy spirit to be poured out in the last days. However, the words in Acts 2:16-17 emphasize that it happened long ago, in the days following the ascension of Jesus.

 

Jehovah gave the law to Israel when he wrote the ten commandments upon two tablets of stone which Moses had prepared (Exodus 32:16, 34:1). Jesus also spoke about the commandments. Luke 10:27 says,

"And he answering said, Thou shalt love (the) lord thy god with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself." And, John 15:10 says, "If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love, as I have kept the commandments of my father, and abide in his love."

 

Jesus taught that love was the fulfillment of all the law.

 

Exodus 34:14 says,

"For you shall not worship another god, for Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), jealous is his name, a jealous god (‘el:H410) he is."

 

The people were to worship no other god but Jehovah; however, keep in mind that they could only worship "before him," never in his presence. Only the high priest could worship in the presence of Jehovah, and then only once each year.

 

The Hebrew word for worship, shaw-khaw, means

"to depress, i.e. prostrate (espec. reflex. in homage to royalty or God):--bow (self) down, crouch, fall down (flat), humbly beseech, do (make) obeisance, do reverence, make to stoop, worship." (Strong’s).

 

Worship seems to be acknowledging the lordship of Jehovah through obeisance, or honoring him.

 

In the New Testament, John 5:23 reinforces this same point concerning honor:

"That all may honor the son, even as they honor the father. He that honors not the son, honors not the father who sent him."

 

However, we must be careful not to confuse honor with worship. To honor means to revere, or hold in deep respect. While this verse says we are to honor Jesus, it does not say we are to worship him. The same was true of Jehovah in the Old Testament. People were to bow down before him out of respect for his greatness, and to revere him for it.

 

Worship in the New Testament becomes a matter of the spirit, a different connotation than it had in the Old Testament.

 

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Comments on Leviticus: Sacrifices and Offerings

 

The sacrifices and offerings described in Leviticus were offered "before" Jehovah, who later became the man, Jesus, of the New Testament. All the sacrifices and offerings, all the sacrificial laws, as well as the priesthood itself were fulfilled in Jesus.

 

Hebrews 12:22-24 says,

"But ye have come to mount Sion, and [the] city of [the] living god, heavenly Jerusalem; and to myriads of angels, [the] universal gathering, and to [the] assembly of [the] firstborn [one] registered in [the] heavens, and to the god judge of all, and to [the] spirits of the just [who] have been perfected, and to Jesus mediator of a fresh covenant, and to [the] blood of sprinkling, speaking better things than Abel."

 

Abel’s blood referred to the need for justice because of murder. The shed blood of Jesus spoke better things than Abel’s because it was the price of justice paid for the sin of the whole world.

 

I Peter 1:2 says,

"according to [the] foreknowledge of god [the] father, by sanctification of [the] spirit, unto [the] obedience and sprinkling of [the] blood of Jesus Christ: Grace to you, and peace be multiplied."

 

The blood of Jesus brought grace and peace, while Abel’s cried out for justice.

 

The sacrifices described in Leviticus, as well as the Passover described in Exodus, point forward to Jesus and show the connection between Jehovah and Jesus.

 

Hebrews 10:1-10 includes a further clarification of the Old Testament sacrifices in light of the death and sacrifice of Jesus, the lamb of the god.

"For the law having a shadow of the coming good things, not itself the image of the things, never is able to perfect those who approach year by year with the same sacrifices which they offer in perpetuity. Since would they not have ceased to be offered, on account of no longer having any conscience of in those who serve once purged ? But in these (there is) a remembrance of sin year by year. For it is impossible (for the) blood of bulls and of goats to take away sins. Wherefore, coming into the world, he says, Sacrifice and offering thou willedst not, but a body thou didst prepare me. Thou delightedst not in burnt offerings and (sacrifices) for sin. Then I said, Lo, I come [in (the) roll of (the) book it is written of me], to do thy will, O god. Above saying, Sacrifice and offering and burnt offerings and (sacrifices) for sin thou willedst not, nor delightedst in, (which according to the law are offered). Then he said, Lo, I come to do thy will, O god. He takes away the first, that the second he may establish; by which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ, once for all."

 

The author of Hebrews had been arguing that Jesus and his sacrifices were better than anything about the Old Testament sacrifices. The above portion of scripture continued that argument, and also threw a great deal of light on the purpose, and ultimately the futility, of the previous offerings in the light of the sacrifice of Jesus.

 

In Hebrews 10:1, the law mentioned is the one which specified the sacrifices and offerings which were required so people could approach "before" Jehovah without fear. They perceived these sacrifices as the final forgiveness of their sins, although they also knew they would need to repeat the process every year as prescribed in the law.

 

They did not realize that their sacrifices were only shadows of a single future sacrifice which would forgive the sins of the whole world, once and for all. The revelation of the invisible god was a gradual, continuing thing until the final revelation through Jesus.

 

The writer of Hebrews asked the pertinent question. If the sacrifices could have made the people perfect in perpetuity, would they not cease offering them? Year after year, millions of animals and fowls were slain, and their blood shed, so that people might come before Jehovah and live another year without dread, or fear, of punishment.

 

Hebrews 10:4 states emphatically,

"For it is impossible [for the] blood of bulls and of goats to take away sins."

 

If the sacrifices could not take away sin, then what was their purpose? It was so the people would have a clear conscience, and feel free to praise Jehovah, and rejoice before him.

 

The system of laws was to provide a clear conscience. The sacrifices and offerings did nothing as far as finally removing their sins; they only rolled them forward for one year.  [For a thorough discussion of both a good and an evil conscience, see Part I in our book, What Scripture Says About Salvation.]

 

What the people did not know at that time was that Jehovah would have accepted them anyway. All the sacrifices, even that of Jesus, was not to satisfy any need of The God, but to cleanse the consciousness of people, thereby allaying their fear of approaching their god (see Hebrews 10:14-22).

 

Hebrews 10:5-6 says,

"Wherefore, coming into the world, he says, Sacrifice and offering thou willedst not, but a body thou didst prepare me. Thou delightedst not in burnt offerings and (sacrifices) for sin."

 

Jehovah had no pleasure in the multitude of offerings made. They were only a necessity, established for the appeasement of the guilty consciences of the people he had created.

 

This is the exact opposite of what is taught in many churches today.  The common teaching is that these offerings were made because the people had sinned and Jehovah must be appeased. However, that is not what the scriptures say!

 

The sacrifices served to clear the consciences of the people coming before Jehovah. Appeasement of a god is the approach of paganism, but not the message of the bible.

 

Who was it that came into the world? It was Jehovah, the god of Israel, who was made flesh, who became the man, Jesus. Throughout the Old Testament, who spoke for the invisible god? It was Jehovah who gave expression to the thoughts and will of the invisible god.

 

Jehovah made the will of the invisible god concrete, and visible, to the eyes of the people, even though the people were completely unaware of his existence. It was Jehovah who received a human body from the invisible god, the "a god" of Genesis 1:1.

 

Jesus explained all this to his followers.

"I am the living bread which came down out of heaven: if anyone shall have eaten of this bread, he shall live for ever; and the bread which I will give is also my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world." (John 6:51).

 

What could be plainer than this statement?

 

Hebrews 10:9 says,

"Lo, I come to do thy will, O god. He takes away the first, that the second he may establish."

 

The entire economy of the Old Testament sacrificial laws were taken away.  They were annulled.

 

Recall Exodus 12, which said that each Israelite family was to kill a lamb and smear its blood on the portal and lintels of the door so the death angel would pass over that home and not kill the first-born son. In our discussion of Exodus, we showed how all the lambs slain at that time were combined into one, or at least spoken of in that manner, when it said, "the whole congregation shall kill it."  Why would the scriptures speak of all the sacrificial lambs slain that night as "it," a singular expression? It had to wait for John to clarify this point.

 

John 1:29 says,

"On the morrow, John sees Jesus coming to him, and says, Behold the lamb of the god, who takes away the sin of the world."

 

The "it" back in Exodus referred to Jesus. This shows the progression of the Passover lamb, from first being for one family, to being for all of Israel, and finally being enlarged to be the sacrifice for the sins of the entire world.

 

This lamb of the invisible god was the man, Jesus. He was the fulfillment of the shadows cast by the Old Testament sacrifices and offerings, including that of the Passover lamb. No longer did sacrifices need to be made before Jehovah. He had now become the man, Jesus, and he had provided himself as a sacrificial lamb to cleanse the conscience of all men so they would come directly to their heavenly father.

 

Luke 2:14 says that the angels were singing a new song:

"Glory in (the) highest to god, and on earth peace, good pleasure in men."

 

The peace spoken of here is the peace that comes between The God and men. Jesus, by his sacrifice, brought that peace, just as it was symbolized by the peace offering of the Old Testament.

 

Ephesians 2:13-15 says,

"But now in Christ Jesus, ye who once were afar off are become near by the blood of the christ. For he is our peace, who made both one, and broke down the middle wall of the fence; in his flesh having annulled the enmity, the law of commandments in decrees; that in himself he might create the two into one new man, making peace."

 

Peace was not only made between the invisible god and mankind, but also between the Jews and the Gentiles.

 

Up to this point, Jews and Gentiles were separated in the temple by a wall, creating one compound for the Jews, and another one for the Gentiles. This division of Jews and Gentiles no longer exists in the eyes of the invisible god.

 

Romans 5:1 sheds additional light on this point.

"Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace toward the god through our lord Jesus Christ."

 

Thus far, we can see that Jesus is set forth in the New Testament as the fulfillment of both the Passover and the peace offerings.

 

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Burnt Offerings

 

Jesus was also the embodiment of the shadow cast forward by burnt offering sacrifices, which were previously only offered "before" Jehovah. When Jehovah became flesh, to whom did those burnt offerings apply?

 

In the Old Testament, since these burnt offering sacrifices were intended to bring joy to the people, it was also a time of celebration. Why? Because during this sacrifice, the person offering the sacrifice pressed his hands on the head of the beast to be killed, thus identifying himself with his sacrifice. Then, the person offering the sacrifice slew the animal, or fowl, himself. This symbolized that the animal was shedding its blood in the place of the person offering the sacrifice. The person could then feel that his sin had been put out of the way, and he could have the joy of being before Jehovah without fear.

 

After the animal was slain by its owner, the priest then had a part to play in the sacrifice. He took some of the animal’s blood and sprinkled it upon the altar, and poured out some of the blood at the foot of the altar. Because the scriptures state that the "life was in the blood" (Leviticus 17:11), this symbolized that a life–the person’s life–was offered to Jehovah, who to these people was the god (elohim) of life. They believed that all life flowed from him, which was correct up to a point. What they did not realize was that the invisible god of heaven, only later revealed by Jesus, was the prime power in the process of life.

 

The priest was the intermediary, and only the priest could take any part of the burnt offering (ola) to the altar. It was a sin for anyone else to do so. Since this was an offering of joy and reverence, that indicates that Jesus was also the fulfillment of this offering.

 

Hebrews 12:2 says that,

"Looking away to Jesus, the leader and completer of faith; who in view of the joy lying before him endured (the) cross, having despised the shame, and sat down at (the) right hand of the throne of the god."

 

Jesus offered himself as a burnt offering (ola) unto the invisible god of heaven because of the joy he perceived.  This joy was the realization that by sacrificing himself, the entire world would be reconciled unto his father, The God.

 

II Corinthians 5:18-19 says,

"And all things (are) of the god, who reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and gave to us the ministry of reconciliation, how that god was in christ, reconciling [the] world to himself, not reckoning their offences to them."

 

This was the joy Jesus perceived when he offered himself as a burnt offering. He was the fulfillment of all the burnt offerings during the Old Testament regime. The reconciliation of mankind through the death of Jesus, the Christ, was looked at through the burnt offering (ola), not so much as an offering for sin as it was for the general alienation between men and the invisible god of heaven. Hence, reconciliation was the major theme of the burnt offering (ola). It was for the purpose of bringing peace and joy, or celebration, to the people.

 

We also need to give attention to the ola kalil, the whole burnt offering. In the ordinary burnt offerings (ola), the priest and the person offering the sacrifice each ate part of the flesh of the animal being offered. It could even be considered a joyful party as the family feasted upon the part of the animal not burnt on the altar before Jehovah, or given to the priests to eat.

 

However, the whole burnt offering was different both in purpose and in kind. All of it was burnt as an offering before Jehovah, none was left for the participants.

 

Jesus was also the fulfillment of the whole burnt offering as indicated in Hebrews 13:11-13, as well as all the other sacrifices and offerings.

"For of those animals whose blood is brought [as sacrifice] for sin into the holies by the high priest, of these the bodies are burned outside the camp. Wherefore also Jesus, that he might sanctify the people by his own blood, suffered outside the gate. Therefore, we should go forth to him outside the camp, bearing his reproach."

 

Jesus was the whole burnt offering, the ola kalil, whose blood was taken into the holy of holies in the heavens and the temple there was cleansed with his blood.

 

This was referred to in Revelations 21:9:

"And came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues, and spoke with me, saying, Come hither, I will show thee the bride, the lamb’s wife."

 

Revelation 21:10 shows that the lamb’s wife was,

"the great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of the heaven from the god."

 

This new Jerusalem is pictured as a place of contentment and fellowship, fulfilling the intent of the whole burnt offering.

 

There seems to be little difference in the sin offering and the trespass offering. The trespass offering was enumerated separately from the sin offering largely based on the feelings of the one bringing the offering. The trespass offering was made when there was a definite sense of guilt. The process of offering it was quite similar to the other burnt offerings.

 

Even as the trespass offering was for the admitted guiltiness of the person, Jesus was the sacrifice which removed this sense of guilt from the whole world, and he died for their sin. His blood was poured out that they might have eternal life with joy and peace.

 

The drink offering was also poured out upon the altar of burnt offerings. It, too, rose as a sweet smelling savor unto Jehovah.

 

The New Testament says that when Jesus shed his blood, it was a sin offering poured out at the foot of the altar. Furthermore, the way Paul used the words "poured out," Jesus’ blood could also be seen as a drink offering. He wrote,

"But, if also I am poured out on the sacrifice and ministration of your faith, I rejoice, and rejoice with you all" (Philippians 2:17).

 

Although the KJV translated the word spendomai as offered upon, it is more accurately translated as "poured out."  It is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew word used to describe the drink offering being poured out upon the altar.

 

Paul pictured himself as the container to be emptied out for the good of others. The only other place this word was used in the New Testament is in II Timothy 4:6, where Paul wrote,

"For I already am being poured out (spendo:G4689), and the time of my release is come."

 

This clearly shows that Paul used spendomai in the same sense of the drink offering, as a pouring out of one’s life. In the case of Jesus, it was the pouring out of his blood which was also a drink offering.

 

The wave offering commemorated the first fruits of the harvest. A sheaf of the first grain harvested was offered before Jehovah in appreciation for his goodness and providence in providing food to eat. However, in the case of Jesus, the New Testament cast this in a new perspective.

 

According to I Corinthians 15:20-23, Jesus is a first-fruit of the dead.

"But now Christ has been raised from among (the) dead, he became firstfruit of those fallen asleep. For since by man (is) death, also by man resurrection of (the) dead. For as in Adam all die, so also in the Christ all shall be made alive, but each in his own rank: Christ, (the) firstfruit, then those of Christ at his coming."

 

This emphasizes what the wave offerings in the Old Testament were all about. They were not only the offering of thanks for the harvest, but as explained in the New Testament, they also signified the most important harvest of all: the "harvest" of people unto the invisible god of heaven.

 

The Bible not only shows that Jesus was the fulfillment of all the sacrifices and offerings, but it also teaches that there are still sacrifices which the follower of Jesus should make. Just as those Old Testament sacrifices were made at some cost, the same is true of followers in the New Testament.

 

Hebrews 13:16 points out that the good works of people are regarded as a sacrifice.

"But of doing good and of communicating be not forgetful, for with such sacrifices the god is well pleased."

 

In Romans 12:1, Paul said,

"Therefore, I exhort you, brethren, by the compassions of the god, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, well-pleasing to the god, your intelligent service."

 

Paul also recognized the priesthood of every person, and wrote this in the Old Testament style language of the Levitical system. He was saying to the Romans, that as a priest, they should put their bodies on the altar as an offering to The God, who gave his son for them.

 

Paul called this "your intelligent service."  People who serve The God of heaven today realize there is a cost, or sacrifice, involved in such service. That is precisely why many are unwilling to offer their service to the invisible god of heaven. Some say that such service simply costs too much. However, those who do offer such service experience the satisfaction, fellowship, and joy of the lord.

 

There is another service which, at first thought, seems to be without any cost to the person doing it. Hebrews 13:15 says,

"By him therefore we should offer [the] sacrifice of praise continually to the god, that is, fruit of (the) lips confessing to his name."

 

In reality, even following this seemingly innocuous sacrifice can cost far more than anticipated, since there is no cheap way to serve The God

 

This is probably one of the most difficult sacrifices. First, our flesh will say that if we speak out about the goodness of The God, and praise him for it, we will probably be ridiculed, or considered some kind of religious nut. This may be one reason why we hear so little praise to The God in everyday life, or why we, ourselves, personally thank God and praise him so little in everyday life. Not many of us truly put our bodies on the sacrificial altar, as a reasonable service would dictate.

 

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The Priesthood

 

Now, let us consider the priesthood that served at the tabernacle, and later at the temple in Jerusalem. Aaron and his family were appointed to be the chief priests to serve at the tabernacle. The tribe of Levites was appointed to be the helpers, and do much of the menial work associated with the offerings and the service of the tabernacle and the temple.

 

All of the priests were for the service of Jehovah, the god of Israel, who indicated his presence by the shekinah cloud in the holy of holies. The holy of holies was shut off by a veil from everyone but the high priest, who went in once a year to make atonement for the people.

 

The priesthood was also a shadow of things to come, of which Jesus was the fulfillment. Jehovah acted as a god, or a king, to the people of Israel. He was the one who judged between right and wrong, rewarded good, and punished Israel for intentional errors. One of Israel’s greatest errors was constantly worshiping the false gods around them. They would stop worshiping Jehovah, whom they could not see, in order to worship some idol made of wood, stone, or metal which they could see.

 

Some people today write that the religion of the Israelites was copied from those false religions. There are many reasons to dispute this, but even if it were true, what would people have upon which to base any hope of the future life?

 

What happens after this life? Only the Bible has any sensible answers for the spiritual questions that lie closest to our minds. Consider, too, that where Jehovah admonished his people to be obedient and to walk uprightly, many of the false religious exercises appealed to the most prurient desires of the flesh.

 

The New Testament informs us that Jesus was the fulfillment of the shadow cast by Jehovah in the Old Testament. He was the fulfillment of it precisely because he was that shadow. He was Jehovah, who was made flesh, and called by the name of Jesus. He was the Jehovah of Israel, who John 1:11 says

"came to his own, and his own received him not."

 

The Jews simply would not acknowledge that Jesus was their god, Jehovah. They could only see Jesus as Joseph’s son. How could this Jesus be Jehovah? Jehovah was the giver of all the Old Testament laws. Those laws, of course, had originated in the mind of the invisible god of heaven, but Jehovah had given them substance. It was Jehovah who wrote the ten commandments, and he also gave the laws concerning all the sacrifices and offerings.

 

Hebrews 10:1 says,

"For the law having a shadow of the coming good things, not itself the image of the things, never is able to perfect those who approach year by year with the same sacrifices which they offer in perpetuity."

 

This definitely states that the law was a "shadow of coming good things."

 

The Old Testament law only cast a shadow, while the New Testament revealed the substance which threw that shadow. The law could not (ouk, the absolute no) perfect any of those approaching Jehovah. The Old Testament sacrifices had to be done over every year. Why? Hebrews 10:4 says,

" For it is impossible (for the) blood of bulls and of goats to take away sins."

 

Take away comes from the same word (aphaireo) used in John 1:29 when John, the Baptist, spoke of the lamb of The God that takes away the sin of the world. The sacrificing of bulls and goats only prefigured, or foreshadowed, the death of Jesus, the Christ, whose blood finally did take away the sins of mankind forever. Never again would there need to be another sacrifice.

 

Hebrews 10:9 explains why the Old Testament laws concerning sacrifices and offerings were taken away.

"Then he said, Lo, I come to do thy will, O god. He takes away the first, that the second he may establish."

 

The "second" law of sacrifices and offerings is summed up in Hebrews 10:10:

"By which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ, once for all."

 

Before, only Israel was set apart by the sacrifices. Now, however, Jesus has sanctified the entire human race, and that includes everyone from Adam onward! This is an astounding development of the biblical sacrificial system that all began with Cain and Abel!

 

When the sacrifices and offerings were eliminated, there was no longer any need for the priesthood to offer them. Therefore, Jesus was the fulfillment of the priesthood, as well as the Old Testament law concerning the sacrifices and offerings.

 

Much care should be taken when someone states that Jesus has fulfilled all the law, especially in the sense that the Old Testament laws no longer apply to our lives. Only the sacrificial laws were done away with, or annulled, by the death of Jesus. The ten commandments still stand as a guide for our lives, just as they always have since they were given. Jesus did fulfill them, but he did not annul them.

 

Paul said that we establish those laws of the ten commandments (Romans 3:31). Hebrews 7:19-28 also addresses this very subject.

"(For the law perfected nothing) but [the] introduction of a better hope by which we draw near to god. And by how much [it was] not apart from [the] swearing of an oath, (for they are become priests without [the] swearing of an oath, but he with [the] swearing of an oath, by him who says, as to him, [the] lord swore, and will not repent, Thou [art] a priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedec,) by so much Jesus has become surety of a better covenant. And they are many priests on account of being hindered from continuing by death; but he, because of his abiding for ever, has the intransmissable priesthood. Whence he is able also to completely save those who approach to god by him, always living to intercede for them. For us such became a high priest, holy, harmless, undefiled, separated from sinners, and higher than the heavens become: who has not necessity day by day, as the high priests, first to offer up sacrifices for his own sins, then for those of the people; for this he did once for all, having offered himself up. For the law constitutes men high priests, [who] have infirmity; but the word of the swearing of the oath, which [is] after the law, has perfected a son for ever."

 

After Jesus offered up himself once there was no need for any sacrifice ever again for the forgiveness of sins and the reconciliation of men to The God. The law could never have done this. Therefore, the Levitical laws were annulled. They were only shadows pointing forward to Jesus who was the ultimate sacrifice.

 

Being in the order of Melchizedek meant that Jesus would never need to be replaced. He would live forever to intercede for mankind; therefore, we need no more sacrifices, no more fallible priesthood, and no more tabernacle or temple.  [There was also no more need for a tithe to support the priestly system. See our study on Tithing for a complete discussion of this point.]

 

If the tabernacle, and the holy of holies in particular, were only shadows, what did they point forward to?  The holy of holies was behind a veil, which separated all but the high priest from the presence of Jehovah, signified by the glory cloud which abided above the mercy seat in the holy of holies.

 

Hebrews 9:1-3 describes this holy place, and the holy of holies, or most holy place.

"Therefore, indeed, the first tabernacle had ordinances of service, and the sanctuary, a worldly [one]. For a tabernacle was prepared, the first, which is called holy, in which [were] both the lampstand and the table and the presentation of the loaves; after but the second veil, a tabernacle which [is] called holy of holies."

 

Carefully note that this sanctuary for Israel was called a "worldly sanctuary."

 

A further explanation is found in Hebrews 9:6-11.

"Now these things thus having been prepared, the priests at all times enter first into the tabernacle, accomplishing the services; but into the second the high priest alone once in the year, not apart from blood, which he offers for himself and the sins of ignorance of the people: this the spirit the holy signifying, [that] the way of the holies has not yet been made manifest, the first tabernacle still having a standing; which [is] a simile for the present time, in which both gifts and sacrifices are offered, not being able as to conscience to perfect him who serves, [consisting] only in meats and drinks and divers washings, and ordinances of flesh, imposed until [the] time of setting things right. But christ being come high priest of the coming good things, by the greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made by hand, (that is, not of this creation)."

 

All the offerings, and the sacrifices, and the washings associated with the first tabernacle were simply ordinances of the flesh. Christ was the high priest of the coming good things, and a "more perfect tabernacle, not made by hand, and not of this creation."  But, as long as the original, hand-made tabernacle stood, then the way into the heavenly tabernacle was closed to everyone. That first tabernacle was only a simile, or something similar to another.

 

Hebrews 9:21-24 states what it would take to open the way into that heavenly tabernacle in order for Jesus to be the high priest of it.

"And he (Moses) sprinkled the tabernacle too and all the vessels of the ministration with blood in like manner; and almost with blood all things are purified according to the law, and apart from blood-shedding there is no remission. [It was] necessary then [for] the representations of the things in the heavens to be purified with these, but the heavenlies themselves with better sacrifices than these. For the christ entered not into holies made by hands, figures of the true [ones], but into heaven itself, now to appear before the face of the god for us."

 

There is little doubt that the Israelites thought their earthly tabernacle was the pinnacle of being before the presence of their god. Everything in it was purged, or cleansed, with the blood of bulls and goats. This was all a shadow, which meant that the things in the heavenly tabernacle, of which they knew nothing, must also be cleansed with blood. However, only the blood of Jesus was good enough for that purpose.

 

How, and when, was the veil of the heavenly tabernacle torn down in order for Jesus to enter into it, and present himself before the face of the invisible god?  Three of the gospel writers answered part of this question. Matthew 27:50-51:

"And Jesus, having cried again with a loud voice, yielded up [his] spirit. And behold, the veil of the temple was rent into two from top to bottom, and the earth was shaken, and the rocks were rent."

 

Mark 15:37-38:

"And Jesus, having uttered a loud cry, expired. And the veil of the temple was rent into two, from top to bottom."

 

Luke 23:44-45:

"And it was about [the] sixth hour, and darkness came the whole land until [the] ninth hour. And the sun was darkened, and the veil of the temple was rent in [the] midst."

 

When Jesus died, the veil before the holy of holies in the earthly temple was torn into two pieces. Remember, everything associated with the earthly tabernacle foretold a heavenly event. Therefore, there had to be a corresponding event in the heavenly tabernacle of which the earthly tabernacle was only a pattern, or shadow.

 

The first veil hung before the holy place. The second veil hung before the holy of holies. The third veil was the shekinah glory cloud which hid Jehovah. The fourth veil was the body of Jesus, which was the veil before the holy of holies in heaven.

 

At the same time the earthly veil was torn in two, why was the heavenly veil also rent? Hebrews 10:16-20 provides the answer.

"This [is] the covenant which I will covenant towards them after those days, says [the] lord, giving my laws into their hearts, also I will inscribe them into their minds; and their sins and their lawlessness in no wise will I remember any more. But where remission of these [is], no longer [is there] an offering for sin. Having, therefore, brethren, boldness for entrance into the holies by the blood of Jesus, a newly made and living way, which he dedicated for us through the veil, that is, his flesh."

 

The rending of the earthly veil before the holy of holies was the last of the shadows cast by the earthly tabernacle. Its usefulness was now over. This passage reveals that Jesus was the veil of the heavenly tabernacle, and this veil had to be rent before people could approach the invisible god. The heavenly veil, Jesus, was rent when he was crucified, and his flesh gave up the life that was in it.

 

What was it in the earthly tabernacle which foreshadowed Jesus as being the heavenly veil? The Israelites could only come "before" Jehovah. This signified that the way to the invisible god in heaven, whom they knew nothing about, was not yet open to them. They had no access.

 

Behind the earthly veil dwelt the presence of Jehovah, the glory cloud. Jehovah, then, was a third veil between the people and the invisible god of heaven. It was he who had to become flesh, which he did, in the person known to us as Jesus. The word of the Old Testament, Jehovah, became flesh; and it was Jehovah who prefigured the coming person of Jesus who would be the heavenly veil that was rent.

 

After Jesus died, the way to the invisible god of heaven was open. Anyone who wished to fellowship with the heavenly father could go in through the way Jesus had opened. No wonder John 14:6 says,

"I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the father, but by me."

 

By his life and death, Jesus had opened the only way to his father. No one can come to the invisible heavenly father except through the way Jesus opened. This is why Jesus told his disciples in a parable,

"Verily, verily, I say unto you, that I am the door of the sheep. All whoever came before me are thieves and robbers; but the sheep did not hear them. I am the door: if anyone enter in by me, he shall be saved, and shall go in and shall go out, and shall find pasture" (John 10:7-9).

 

There are over 50 scripture references remaining which either equate Jehovah and Jesus, or which show that the two were closely allied.

 

Numbers 6:23-27 says that Jehovah pronounced his name upon the people of Israel.

"Say to Aaron and his sons (saying), Thus shall you bless the people of Israel. You shall say to them, Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) bless you and keep you. Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) make his face to shine upon you and be gracious to you. Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) lift up his countenance upon you and give you peace. So shall they put my name upon the people of Israel, and I will bless them"

 

The people were now under Jehovah’s protection and providence for all their needs.

 

Ephesians 1:3-4 says that The God did the same with all people of the earth by choosing them in Jesus.

"Blessed [be] the god and father of our lord Jesus Christ, who blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenlies with christ; according as he chose us in him before [the] foundation of [the] world, for us to be holy and blameless before him in love."

 

The word translated chosen comes from ekelekato, which means elected. We were not elected by ourselves, but only in Christ, who was, and is, the only man ever elected by The God (see Luke 23:35). If Jesus, in reality, was the christ—which he was—then he was the only one chosen by The God. We are only chosen "in him."

 

Now that we are in Christ, he is the supplier of all our needs, both physical and spiritual, just as Jehovah was for the Israelites. This is simply a logical extension. The same word of the Old Testament took on flesh to be the word of the New Testament, Jesus, the Christ.

 

Ephesians 2:10 also shows that it is The God who, through Jesus, causes every good or righteous work anyone may accomplish in this life.

"For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which the god prepared before, that we should walk in them."

 

When The God acted, it was for the whole of humanity "in Christ Jesus." In his own strength, man cannot, and will not, ever bring forth righteous works. The God has preordained what those works are, and put Jesus in charge of enabling them.  This is why Jesus bestowed a portion of holy spirit upon all flesh. Just as Jehovah of the Old Testament guided his people, Jesus of the New Testament will guide all men into the path which is pleasing to The God.

 

Numbers 9:14 reveals that Jehovah was a god not only to the Israelites, but also to any stranger who sojourned among them and chose to participate in the Passover statutes.

"And if a stranger sojourns among you, and will keep the passover to Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), according to the statute of the passover, and according to its ordinance, so shall he do You shall have one statute, both for the sojourner, and for the native." Acts 15:14 says, "Simeon related how first the god visited to take out of nations a people for his name."

 

Please keep in mind when reading scriptures such as this passage that just because the words "the god" appear it does not necessarily indicate the invisible god of heaven. It may simply be a renewed mention of a different god, or Jesus, a god of all people. Later in this study, we will examine such scriptures more fully.

 

Ephesians 3:14-15 says,

"For this cause I bow my knees to the father of our lord Jesus Christ, of whom every family in [the] heavens and on earth is named."

 

Who are all the families of the earth named after? It can not be the invisible god of heaven because he has no name. That leaves Jesus to be a god to the people under the auspices of the invisible god whose existence has now been revealed. The invisible god of heaven guides the actions of Jesus, just as he did for Jehovah.

 

Numbers 11:16-17 reveals that, in the Old Testament, Jehovah was the one in charge of holy spirit, and he bestowed it upon whomsoever he chose for a special work.

"And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) said to Moses, Gather for me seventy men of the elders of Israel, whom you know to be (that they are) the elders of the people, and officers over them, and bring them to the tent of meeting, and let them take their stand there with you. And I will come down and talk with you there; and I will take some of the spirit which is upon you, and put it upon them. And they shall bear the burden of the people with you, that you may not bear it not yourself alone."

 

In the New Testament, Jesus, Jehovah become flesh, is still in charge of holy spirit. Jesus, through himself, has chosen everyone to do a special work for the invisible god of heaven.

 

When Peter was preaching on the day of Pentecost, he explained to the crowd what was happening.

"But this is that which has been spoken by the prophet Joel: And it shall be in the last days, says the god, I will pour out of my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your elders shall dream dreams." (Acts 2:16-17).

 

Jehovah, in the Old Testament, poured out holy spirit on whom he chose, enabling them to fulfill his desires. Jesus, likewise, has charge of holy spirit, and poured it out upon everyone, enabling them to fulfill their charge.

 

Much of the Old Testament seems to be a parable with the answer provided in the New Testament. For example, Numbers 20:12-17 tells how Moses smote the rock instead of speaking to it. Because of this disobedience, Moses was not allowed to lead the people into the promised land.

 

I Corinthians and Hebrews explain why.

"And all drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank of a spiritual rock following, and the rock was the christ." (I Corinthians 10:4).

 

Moses probably did not understand that the rock he struck, and later spoke to, symbolized Jesus, the Christ. Therefore, he was in deep trouble when he disobeyed Jehovah’s direct command and struck the rock a second time instead of speaking to it as ordered.

 

What was so bad about this was explained in Hebrews 6:4-6:

"For [it is] impossible to again renew to repentance those once enlightened, and [who] tasted of the heavenly gift, and became partakers of [the] spirit holy, and tasted [the] good of god word and [the] works of power of [the] age to come, and [who] fall away, crucifying for themselves [as they do] the son of the god, and exposing [him] publicly."

 

The rock, Jesus, was to be struck, crucified, only once. When Moses struck it again, it foreshadowed those who, in unbelief, would crucify him again. The invisible god will not allow this to happen without imposing consequences to those who do so.

 

Numbers 21:6 describes how Jehovah sent poisonous snakes into the Israelite camp after they had grievously sinned.

"Then Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) sent fiery serpents among the people, and they bit the people so that many people of Israel died."

 

But, Numbers 21:8 says that Jehovah, in his mercy, also provided a remedy.

"And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) said to Moses, Make (for yourself) a fiery serpent, and set it on a pole; and (it shall be) every one that is bitten, when he sees it, shall live."

 

A parallel to this is found in John 3:14-16, when Jesus explained the meaning of the episode in Numbers.

"And even as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, thus it behooves the son of man to be lifted up, that everyone who believes on him may not perish, but may have eternal life. For the god so loved the world, that he gave his son, the only begotten, that everyone who believes on him may not perish, but may have eternal life."

 

Here, again, it appears that the Old Testament teaching was a parable explained in the New Testament. Moses lifted up a serpent which represented the sin of the people, and those who looked at it believing they would be healed, went on living. Jesus represented the sin of the people which he took upon himself, and died in order that whoever looked believing on him would not perish, but would continue having the life they had already received as a gift from the invisible god.

 

Judges 6:34 indicates that Jehovah could have the spirit take control of whomever he chose, such as Gideon.

"But the spirit of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) took possession of Gideon, and he sounded the trumpet; and the Abiezrites were called out after him." Acts 2:18 says, "And even upon my bondman and upon my bondwoman, in those days will I pour out of my spirit, and they shall prophesy."

 

This is a quote from Joel 2:28-32, where he prophesied that holy spirit would take possession of men and women in the last days.  [For a more detailed discussion of this point, see Part III in our book, What Scripture Says About Salvation.]

 

I Samuel 3:19-21 says that Jehovah began to reveal himself by his word.

"And Samuel grew, and Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) was with him, and let none of his words fall to the ground. And all Israel from Dan even to Beer-sheba knew that Samuel was established as a prophet of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068). And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) again appeared in Shiloh: for Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) revealed himself to Samuel at Shiloh by the word of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068)."

 

John 3:11-12 relates the words of Jesus as he spoke to Nicodemus, who recognized that Jesus was "a teacher come from a god."  Jesus was trying to help him understand that he was much more, that he was the Jehovah of the Old Testament who had known the invisible god.

"Verily, verily, I say to thee, We speak that which we know, and that which we have seen we bear witness of, and our witness ye believe not. If I said earthly things to you, and ye believe not, how will ye believe if I say heavenly things to you?"

 

Nicodemus was not ready to hear heavenly things. He just would not believe. Being the Jew that he was, he thought of Jehovah as only a spiritual being, not a man. This was the biggest hurdle Jehovah confronted when he came in the flesh as Jesus, and declared himself to be who he was. A later chapter will discuss how Jesus gradually brought about this revelation of himself.

 

I Samuel 26:23, quoting David, reveals that in the future Jehovah would reward every man for his righteousness and his faithfulness to him.

"Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) rewards every man for his righteousness and his faithfulness. For Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) gave you today into my hand, and I would not put forth my hand against anointed of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068)."

 

The New Testament speaks of judgment rendered through Jesus. Romans 2:6-9 says,

"Who will render to each according to his deeds: to those that with endurance in good work, glory and honor and incorruptibility are seeking, life eternal. But to those of contention, and who disobey the truth but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath, tribulation and strait, on every soul of man that works out evil, both of Jew first and Greek."

 

And, Revelation 20:12-13 says,

"And I saw the dead, small and great, standing before the god, and books were opened; and book another was opened, which is [that] of life. And the dead were judged out of the things written in the books, according to their works. And the sea gave up the dead in it, and death and hades gave up the dead in them; and they were judged, each according to their works."

 

This last verse refers to the second coming of Jesus, when he will judge every man’s work, whether good or evil. Their works will determine whether or not men will enter the kingdom of god. The kingdom will be gained only through good works, which are based on love and faith of The God, and his son Jesus, thus allowing The God to work his will, producing good works through them.

 

II Samuel 7:14-16 says that Jehovah sets up kings and unseats kings.

"I will be his father, and he shall be my son. When he commits iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, with the stripes of the sons of men. And my steadfast love shall not depart from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away from before you. And your house shall be made sure, and your kingdom for ever; your throne shall be established before you for ever."

 

The New Testament equivalent is found in Revelation 19:16.

"And he has upon [his] garment and upon his thigh the name written, King of Kings, and lord of lords."

 

Jehovah became the man, Jesus; he was crucified; he ascended to the father in heaven; and he will return to earth as a glorified man. However, just as he did in the Old Testament, he is still the one who orders other kings and lords to do his will.

 

I Kings 2:26-27 says that Jehovah always keeps his word.

"And to Abiathar ,the priest, the king said, Go to Anathoth, to your estate, for you are a man of death; but at this time I will not put you to death because you bore the ark of the lord (‘adonay:H136) Yahweh (yehovih:H3069) before my father David, and because you shared in all that my father was afflicted. So Solomon expelled Abiathar from being priest to Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), thus fulfilling the word of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), which he had spoken concerning the house of Eli in Shiloh."

 

The equivalent of this is found in Romans 3:4.

"May it not be! But let the god be true, and every man false, according as it has been written, That thou shouldest be justified in thy words, and overcome in thy being judged."

 

Following the cross references shows that the god referred to here is not the invisible god of heaven, but the Old Testament Jehovah, who is being quoted.

 

I Kings 17:22 indicates that Jehovah gives life to the dead.

"And Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) hearkened to the voice of Elijah, and the breath of the child came again into him, and he revived."

 

A similar story, involving the prophet Elisha, occurs in II Kings 4:32-35.

 

In the New Testament, John 11:43-44 says,

"And having said these things, he cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come forth. And he who had been dead came forth, bound feet and hands with grave clothes, and with a handkerchief about his face. Jesus says to them, Loose him and let [him] go."

 

Notice that in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, only physical life was restored by Jehovah and Jesus. The people raised to life died again. These episodes only foreshadowed the time when Jesus would be resurrected. When Jesus ascended to the father in heaven, he would be a life-giving spirit, re-assuming, as a glorified man, the office he had previously held as Jehovah.

 

Deuteronomy 9:4 states that before Israel entered the promised land they were warned not to take credit for what Jehovah had done for them.

"Do not say in your heart, after Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), your god (‘elohiym:H430), has thrust them out before you (saying), Because of my righteousness Yahweh(yehovah:H3068) has brought me in to possess this land, whereas it is because of the wickedness of these nations Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) is driving them out before you."

 

The Israelites were not inheriting the promised land because of their own righteousness, but because Jehovah had given his word, the covenant.

 

In Romans 6:13-20, Paul admonished people to commit themselves as bondmen to righteousness and sanctification, neither of which they could manage to accomplish without allowing themselves to be vessels, or tools, in the hand of god. Paul expounded further on that point in Romans 10:3.

"For being ignorant of the righteousness of the god, and seeking to establish their own righteousness, they submitted not to the righteousness of the god."

 

Because of the scriptures, people now know, or ought to know, that both Jehovah and Jesus were only intermediaries between the invisible god of heaven and the people. The word of The God was known in the Old Testament as Jehovah, who became Jesus, the word of The God in the New Testament.

 

Titus 3:5 expands on this thought.

"Not by works which [were] in righteousness which practiced we, but according to his mercy he saved us, through [the] washing of regeneration and renewing of [the] holy spirit."

 

I Chronicles 29:17 introduces the thought that Jehovah looks upon the heart.

"I know, my god (‘elohiym:H430), that thou triest the heart, and thou hast pleasure in uprightness. I, in the uprightness of my heart, have freely offered all these, and now I have seen joyously thy people, who are present here, offering freely to thee."

 

The disciples sought divine help in knowing who was to take the place of Judas. Acts 1:24 says,

"And praying, they said, Thou lord, knower of the hearts of all, of these two, show one which thou didst chose to receive the part of this service and apostleship."

 

Here, again, is another parallel scripture between Jehovah and Jesus.

 

Psalms 7:10 says,

"Oh let the evil of the wicked come to an end, but establish thou the righteous, thou righteous god (‘elohiym:H430), thou who triest the hearts and minds."

 

Psalms 9:8-10 says,

"But Yahweh sits enthroned for ever; he has established his throne for judgment, and he judges the world with righteousness, he judges the people with equity. Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) is a stronghold for the oppressed, a stronghold in times of trouble."

 

Both these passages from Psalms indicate that Jehovah establishes his throne for judgment, and that he judges the world.

 

John 5:22 identifies Jesus as the New Testament fulfillment of these passages.

"For the father judges no one, but has given all judgment to the son."

 

The first part of Psalms 11:4, acknowledging the spiritual nature of Jehovah, says that he dwells in heaven.

"Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) [is] in the temple of his holiness, Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) [is] in heaven."

 

Mark 16:19 says,

"Therefore, indeed, after speaking to them, the lord was taken up into heaven, and sat at [the] right hand of the god."

 

Jehovah, the god of Israel, became the man, Jesus, who received a glorified body, and who is now abiding in heaven with the Father, awaiting his return to earth. After abiding on the earth as Jesus, he is again abiding with the Father in heaven, in the same manner he had as Jehovah.

 

In total, Psalms 11:4 says,

"Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) [is] in the temple of his holiness, Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) [is] in heaven. His eyes behold, his eyelids test, the children of men."

 

David was acknowledging that Jehovah was interested in all men. John 1:14-16 states,

"And the word became flesh, and tabernacled among us, and we discerned his glory, a glory as of one only-begotten with a father, full of grace and truth. John witnesses concerning him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I said, He who comes after me has precedence of me, for he was before me. And of his fullness we all received, and grace upon grace."

 

John was pointing out that all men had received grace. Jehovah’s character did not change after he became Jesus.

 

David, looking down the aisles of time, saw Jehovah enthroned as a king forever.

"Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) sits enthroned over the flood; Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) sits enthroned as king for ever." (Psalms 29:10).

 

Luke 1:32-33, speaking of Jesus, says,

"He shall be great, and he shall be called son of [the] highest, and the lord the god shall give him the throne of David his father; and he shall reign over the house of Jacob to the ages, and there shall not be an end of his kingdom."

 

Thus, we have both Jehovah and Jesus declared as king forever.

 

David, enabled by holy spirit, saw far into the future and prophesied some wonderful events. Psalms 37:13 says that Jehovah had the ability to see far into the future, and knew that his day was coming.

"The lord (‘adonay:H136) laughs at the wicked (at him), for he sees that his day is coming."

 

"His day" is also referred to in Acts 13:32, which states,

"And we announce to you the glad tidings, the promise made to the fathers, that this the god has fulfilled to us their children, having raised up Jesus."

 

Acts 17:31 further elaborates,

"Because he set a day in the which he is about to judge the habitable world in righteousness, by a man whom he appointed; proof having given to all [in] having raised him from among [the] dead."

 

Paul put a somewhat different spin on "his day" in I Corinthians 1:7-8:

"So that ye are behind in not one gift, awaiting the revelation of our lord, Jesus Christ; who also will confirm you to [the] end, unimpeachable in the day of our lord, Jesus Christ."

 

Here, Paul considers the "day" as the day of Jesus’ second coming. The "day" that David spoke of was most likely the time beginning after the resurrection of Jesus and running throughout the next age. That will be quite a day!

 

In Psalms 118:22, David prophesied that,

"The stone which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner. This has become from Yahweh (yehovah:H3068); it is marvelous in our eyes."

 

In the New Testament parable of the vineyard, we find a similar passage.

"What therefore will the lord of the vineyard do? He will come and will destroy the husbandmen, and will give the vineyard to others. Did ye not even read this scripture? [The] stone which those who build rejected, this has become head of [the] corner. This was from [the] lord, and it is wonderful in our eyes." (Mark 12:9-11).

 

Paul also wrote of that "stone" in Ephesians 2:18-22.

"For through him we have access, both by one spirit, to the father. So, then, ye are no longer strangers and sojourners, but fellow-citizens of the saints and of the household of the god, being built up on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being [the] cornerstone, in whom all the building fitted together, increases to a holy temple in [the] lord; in whom ye also are being built together for a habitation of the god in [the] spirit."

 

Proverbs 19:17 says that Jehovah repays those who give to the poor.

"He who is kind to the poor lends to Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), and for his deed he will repay him."

 

The New Testament says the same thing. Matthew 10:42 says that Jesus will be the one who rewards.

"And whoever shall give to one of these little ones only a cup of cold [water] to drink, in [the] name of a disciple, verily I say to you, in nowise shall he lose his reward."

 

Matthew 25:40-43 says,

"And answering, the king will say to them, Verily I say to you, inasmuch as ye did [it] to one of the least these my brethren, ye did [it] to me. Then will he also say to those on [the] left, Go from me, the cursed, into the fire, the eternal, which has been prepared for the devil and his angels. For I hungered, and ye gave not to me to eat; I thirsted, and ye gave not me to drink; I was a stranger, and ye took me not in; naked, and ye did not clothe me; sick, and in prison, and ye did not visit me."

 

This passage points out that inheriting the kingdom is the reward of those who help.

 

In Hebrews 6:10, it is the god who does not forget.

"For the god [is] not unrighteous to forget your work and the labor of love which ye did show to his name, having served to the saints and [still] serving."

 

The God loves his son, and he rewards those who serve in the name of Jesus. The same events are often intertwined between the son, and his father, the invisible god.

 

Proverbs 29:13 says that Jehovah leaves no man without light of knowledge.

"The poor man and the oppressor meet together; Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) gives light to the eyes of both."

 

Neither did he leave any without light after he became Jesus.

 

John 1:4, speaking of Jehovah, says,

"In him was life; and the life was the light of men."

 

John 1:9 elaborates on this light.

"That was the true light which lightens every man coming into the world."

 

This looks forward to when Jehovah became flesh as Jesus (John 1:14).

 

Isaiah 5:16 says that Jehovah will exalt himself in justice and righteousness.

"But Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) of hosts is exalted in justice, and the holy god (‘el:H410) shows himself holy in righteousness."

 

Matthew 3:15 says,

"But Jesus, answering, said to him, Suffer [it] now; for thus it is becoming to us to fulfill all righteousness.

 

Not only does Jesus fulfill all righteousness, but Acts 17:31 says,

"Because he set a day in which he is about to judge the habitable world in righteousness, by a man who he appointed."

 

Jesus, as a man, fulfilled all righteousness, and this qualified him to judge the whole world in righteousness. This will occur when Jesus returns to earth to usher in the kingdom of The God.

 

Isaiah warned the people that unless they returned to Jehovah, all their armies and associations would do them no good.

"Be broken, you peoples, and be dismayed. Give ear, all far countries, gird yourselves and be dismayed, gird yourselves and be dismayed. Take counsel together, but it will come to nought, speak a word but it will not stand, for god (‘el:H410) is with us (Immanuel)." (Isaiah 8:9-10).

 

According to Isaiah 7:14, the name Immanuel also means "god is with us," or literally "god is on our side."

"Therefore, the lord (‘adonay:H136) himself will give you a sign; Behold, a young woman is pregnant and bearing a son, and shall call his name Immanuel."

 

Matthew 1:23 says that Jehovah, the Immanuel of the Old Testament becomes Jesus, the Immanuel of the New Testament.

"Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which is, being interpreted, the god with us."

 

These passages from Isaiah and Matthew illustrate how easily we can be misled unless we examine the grammatical structure carefully. Although Matthew 1:23 contains the words "the god," it is not referring to the invisible god of heaven, but is referring back to verse 1:22 which spoke about the words of the lord, which, as we know from Isaiah, was Jehovah. This use of the phrase "the god" is a renewed mention because Jehovah was the god being spoken of in verse 1:22, and therefore the word "god" required the use of the definite article.

 

Likewise, the words "god with us" are not necessarily stating the presence of Jesus, but indicating that Jesus is always "on our side." This is analogous to children choosing up sides in a game. Jesus is playing on our side. He is for us, not against us.

 

Isaiah 25:7 says that Jehovah will,

"... destroy on this mountain (the face of) [the] covering (which covereth) cast over all peoples, (and) the veil that is spread over all nations."

 

What veil did Isaiah refer to that it is over all nations? Remember that there was a veil before the holy of holies, which was the second veil in the temple. The presence of Jehovah abided within the holy of holies, and he, Jehovah, was the third veil, which was over all nations.

 

That he was invisible indicated the existence of the invisible god of heaven which no man has seen (John 1:18, John 6:46). Jehovah, was not the invisible god of heaven, but only the veil which hid him. Because he was the very expression of that invisible god of heaven, people assumed he was that god. However, knowledge of the latter invisible god had to await the coming of Jesus.

 

The New Testament offers more about this veil. The first few verses of Hebrews 9 explain about the earthly tabernacle, which was only a pattern of the one in heaven. Hebrews 9:8 points out that while the first tabernacle was still standing the way into the holiest holy of holies was not yet opened. Then, verses 9:11-12 declare that Jesus opened the way into the heavenly holy of holies by his own blood. Finally, referring to the crucifixion of Jesus, Hebrews 10:19-20 says,

"Having therefore, brethren, boldness for entrance into the holies by the blood of Jesus, a newly made and living way through the veil, which he dedicated for us, that is, his flesh."

 

Prior to the death of Jesus, no man had ever entered into the presence of the invisible god of heaven.  Jesus not only opened the way, he also revealed the previously unknown presence of the invisible god of heaven, his father.  [For additional comment on these points, see our book, The Hidden Meaning in Hebrews.]

 

Isaiah 30:20-21 says that Jehovah was a teacher.

"And though the lord (‘adonay:H136) give you the bread of (which is) adversity, and water (which is) of affliction, yet your teacher will not hide himself any more, but your eyes shall see your teacher. And your ears shall hear a word behind you, saying, This is the way, walk in it, when you turn to the right or when ye turn to the left."

 

John 3:1-3 says that Jesus was a teacher.

"But there was a man of the Pharisees, Nicodemus his name, a ruler of the Jews; he came to Jesus by night, and said to him, Rabbi, we know that thou hast come a teacher from god, for no one is able to do these signs which thou doest unless god be with him."

 

Since this was before the death of Jesus, the god to which Nicodemus referred was Jehovah, without realizing that Jehovah had become Jesus.

 

Isaiah 40:12-15 reveals that Jehovah held all things in his power, or authority.

"Who has measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, and marked off the heavens with the span, and enclosed in the dust of earth in a measure, and weighed the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance? Who has directed the spirit of Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), or (who, one) as his counselor has instructed him? Whom did he consult for his enlightenment, and who taught him the path of justice, and taught him knowledge, and showed to him the way of understanding? Behold, the nations [are] like a drop from a bucket, and as the dust on the scales are accounted. Behold, he takes up the isles like fine dust."

 

After his resurrection, Jesus said he maintained that same power.

"And having come to [them], Jesus spoke to them, saying, All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me" (Matthew 28:18).

 

Even before his death, John 17:1-2 says,

"These words spoke Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to the heaven, and said, Father, the hour has come; glorify thy the son, that thy son also may glorify thee; as thou gavest him authority over all flesh, that [of] all which thou hast given him, he should give to them life eternal."

 

These two verses show that while here in the flesh, Jesus had authority, or power, over all flesh.

 

After his resurrection and ascension, Jesus was again given all the authority he had as Jehovah in the Old Testament. That authority included everything in heaven and on earth. He was made both lord, and christ, or messiah. But, now, instead of being only a spirit, he was a glorified man, with all the authority, or power. He had become what the first Adam had lost.

 

Isaiah 45:18 says,

"For thus says Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), who created the heavens; he is god (‘elohiym:H430) who formed the earth and made it; he established it, not a chaos; he did create it to be inhabited; he formed it. I am Yahweh (yehovah:H3068), and there is no other."

 

In Colossians, Paul attributes all this to Jesus. However, now knowing about the invisible god of heaven as the first cause of everything, Paul wrote about Jesus as the secondary cause of creation, or the tool of the invisible god in creation.

"Because by him were all things created, the things in the heavens and the things upon the earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones, or lordships, or principalities, or authorities; all things have been created by him and for him" (Colossians 1:16).

 

This point was not at all clear in the Old Testament. Also, Paul makes extensive use of the different prepositions in the above quote, which allows for an interesting grammar study.

 

Isaiah 45:19 says that Jehovah speaks truth and righteousness.

"I did not speak in secret, in a land of darkness; I did not say to the offspring of Jacob, Seek me in chaos. I, Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) speak the truth, I declare what is right."

 

Speaking of Jesus, John 1:14 says,

"And the word became flesh, and tabernacled among us, and we discerned his glory, a glory as of an only-begotten with a father, full of grace and truth."

 

John 1:17 says,

"For the law was given through Moses; the grace and the truth came through Jesus Christ."

 

Again, that which was attributed to Jehovah in the Old Testament, was attributed to Jesus in the New Testament. Jehovah was the truth before becoming flesh, he was still the truth as the man, Jesus.

 

Jeremiah said that Jehovah held the prophets and priests responsible for the spiritual death of his people, and their end would not be good.

"Therefore, thus says Yahweh (yehovah:H3068) of hosts, Concerning the prophets, Behold, I will feed them with wormwood, and give them to drink poisoned water, for from the prophets of Jerusalem has gone forth ungodliness into all the land." (Jeremiah 23:15).

 

Several New Testament scriptures offer parallels to this. I Timothy 1:5-7 says,

"But the end of the charge is love out of a pure heart, and a good conscience, and unfeigned faith; from which some, having missed the mark, turned aside to vain talking, wishing to be law-teachers, understanding neither what they say, nor concerning what they strongly affirm."

 

II Timothy 4:3-4 declares,

"For there will be a time when they will not bear sound teaching; but, having an itching ear, will heap up teachers to themselves according to their own desires; and they will turn the ear away from the truth, and will be turned aside to fables."

 

This last verse seems especially fitting today, since there are few teachers who understand the difference between scripture and denominational doctrine.  There are even fewer who will declare the truth of scripture when it conflicts with denominational doctrine. Both teachers and pupils are responsible for the miserable condition of the teaching found in most organized churches today.

 

James 3:1 also discusses the heavy responsibility of teachers.

"Be not many teachers, my brethren, knowing that we shall receive greater judgment."

 

And, II Peter 2:1-3 warns about false teachers.

"But there were also false prophets among the people, as also among you will be false teachers, who will bring in destructive sects stealthily, and denying the master who brought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction; and many will follow their destructive ways, through whom the way of the truth will be evil spoken of. And through covetousness with well-turned words, they will make gain of you: for whom judgment of old is not idle, and their destruction slumbers not."

 

These scriptures about teachers, particularly the one from James, were part of my consideration when I felt called to teach the word of God. They constantly came to mind whenever I felt pressure to teach some church doctrine that could not be supported by scripture. The peer pressure to "not rock the boat" can be prodigious! Refusal to give in to these pressures cost me much personally. Early on, I had to decide who was to be my guide: the church with its doctrines, or the lord who had called me to teach. Thankfully, I chose the latter.

 

Many religious teachers today are completely unprepared to teach the word of God. Perhaps one reason they accept the "job" is because they are ignorant of the greater judgment that will be theirs when they must answer to Jesus about what they taught.

 

These scriptures should give pause to anyone who is approached with the plea that "the church needs you."  The church is not The God, and it is The God who calls teachers! Perhaps the multitude of those who coerce people, those who have not been called by The God to teach, will also share in the stricter judgment.

 

Ezekiel 16:59-60 says that Jehovah always remembers his covenant of grace.

"Yea, thus says the lord (‘adonay:H136) Yahweh (yehovih:H3069), I will deal with you as you have done, who have despised the oath in breaking my covenant. Yet, I myself, I will remember my covenant with you in the days of your youth, and I will establish an everlasting covenant with you."

 

This is corroborated in Galatians 3:15-17.

"Brethren, (according to man I am speaking), even of man no one sets aside a confirmed covenant , or adds thereto. But to Abraham were spoken the promises, and to his seed: he does not say, And to seeds, as of many, but as of one, And to thy seed, which is christ. This now I say, [the] covenant confirmed beforehand by the god to christ, the law, which took place four hundred and thirty years after, does not annul so as to make the promise of no effect."

 

In these verses, Paul affirms that Jehovah’s covenant is now in the hands of Jesus, the Christ, who now administers it to the people. Hebrews 6:13-18 also refers to the unchangeableness of God’s oath.

 

Ezekiel 33:17 states that Jehovah is not judged of people although they often try to do so.

"Yet, your people say, The way of the Lord (‘adonay:H136) is not just; when it is their way that is not just."

 

The same is true of Jesus. Luke 7:33-34 says that,

"For John the baptist came neither eating bread nor drinking wine; and ye say, He hath a devil. The son of man is come eating and drinking; and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners!"

 

Another instance of men attempting to judge, Jesus, the son of The God, is found in John 10:19-21.

"Therefore, on account of those words, there was again a division among the Jews; but many of them said, he has a demon and is mad; why do ye hear him? Others said, These sayings are not [those] of one possessed by a demon. Is a demon able to open [the] eyes of [the] blind?"

 

There is still a difference of opinion among people today as they judge the character and person of Jesus, the Christ. Some believe he was certainly a good man, but not the son of The God. Others believe that he is their "personal savior," a thoroughly unscriptural designation. Still others believe what the scriptures teach, that Jesus is the Old Testament word of the invisible god made flesh, the messiah, or christ, of The God.

 

Ezekiel 37:12 declares that Jehovah promises to open the graves and bring the people into the land of Israel.

"Therefore, prophesy, and say to them, Thus says the lord (‘adonay:H136) Yahweh (yehovih:H3069), Behold, I will open your graves and raise you from your graves, O my people, and I will bring you into the land of Israel."

 

The parallel to this is found in John 5:28-29.

"Wonder not at this, for an hour is coming in which all those in the tombs shall hear his voice, and shall come forth; those that practised good, to a resurrection of life; and those that did evil, to a resurrection of judgment."

 

Israel is a metaphor for the kingdom of God. Jesus will fulfill this prophecy when he returns to bring people into the kingdom. This is described in I Thessalonians 4:16:

"Because the lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout of command, with archangel’s voice, and with trumpet of god, and the dead in christ shall rise first."

 

Ezekiel 39:29 states that Jehovah promised that in a future time he would pour out his spirit upon the house of Israel.

"And I will not hide my face any more from them, when I pour out my spirit upon the house of Israel, says the lord (‘adonay:H136) Yahweh (yehovih:H3069)."

 

Joel 2:28-29 states the same prophesy.

"And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit on all flesh; your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, and your young men shall see visions. Even upon the manservants and maidservants, I will pour out my spirit in those days."

 

The verses are numbered differently in various translations.  For instance,  Joel 2:28-29 in the KJV, is the same text as Joel 3:1-2 in the Analytical Key to the Old Testament translation, which was used in this study.

 

When Jehovah became Jesus, he poured out holy spirit exactly as promised. Acts 2:16-18, explaining the events at Pentecost, contains a quote from Joel:

"But this is that which has been spoken by the prophet Joel, And it shall be in the last days, says the god, I will pour out of my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy; and your young men shall see visions; and your elders shall dream dreams; and in those days I shall even pour out of my spirit upon my bondmen and my bondwomen, and they shall prophesy."

 

Acts 2:32-33 further elaborates on the prophesy of Ezekiel and states specifically that it was fulfilled by Jesus.

"The god raised up this Jesus, whereof we all are witnesses. Therefore, having been exalted by the right hand of the god, and having received the promise of the holy spirit from the father, he poured out this which now ye behold and hear.

 

The Old Testament prophesy about the spirit was fulfilled after Jesus ascended to the Father, who bestowed upon him the promise of the holy spirit. Just as Jehovah in Old Testament times determined which people received some of the spirit, Jesus, again at the right hand of the invisible god of heaven, was given control over the disposition of holy spirit. This time, however, some of it was given to all flesh, or all men (see Acts 2:17).

 

Before leaving this scripture, we need to compare the term "the god" as used in Acts 2:32-33 with the term "the god" used in Acts 2:17. In Acts 2:32-33, there is no problem ascertaining that "the god" refers to the invisible god of heaven, or as he is sometimes called, the heavenly father. We know that the invisible god exists because Jesus came and declared his presence.

 

This quotation from Joel refers to Jehovah. Thus, "the god" of Acts 2:17 refers to Jesus. It is Jesus who pours out the spirit upon all flesh. He does this after receiving the holy spirit from The God, following his ascension to the right hand of the Father in heaven.

 

Daniel 9:19 says that Jehovah acts as he does for his name’s sake.

"O lord (‘adonay:H136), hear; O lord (‘adonay:H136), forgive; O lord (‘adonay:H136), give heed, and act. Delay not, for thine own sake, O my god (‘elohiym:H430), because thy city and thy people are called by thy name." Matthew 10:22 says, "And ye will be hated by all on account of my name; but he that endures to [the] end, he shall be saved."

 

The word "sake" does not appear in the Greek manuscript, although the KJV added it for clarification.

 

I John 2:12 also explains that we have not been forgiven for our sakes.

"I write to you, little children, because you have been forgiven your sins for the sake of his name."

 

Again, the word "sake" does not appear in the Greek manuscript. The word used is dia, which would mean "on account of" my name. This should give great pause to those who use the name of Jesus lightly, or as a curse. The heavenly father is more than just a little concerned when it comes to how the name of his son is used.

 

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Summary Highlights of Chapter 10

 

# Many scriptures reveal that Jesus, the man, in the New Testament, also

     had many of the same attributes as did Jehovah, the god of Israel, in

     the Old Testament.

 

# The implication here (Isaiah 43:10) is that Jehovah was formed, or

     created. If this is true, then who created the god, Jehovah?

 

# The plain truth of scripture points to two separate gods, and not the

     three persons of an illogical trinity. There was the "a god" which

     created heaven and earth.  Then, there was a god, Jehovah, the god of

     Israel, who was formed by this "a god."  Both gods were separate

     entities.

 

# Jesus was the image of the invisible god, the firstborn of all creation.

     This is both a father and a son; not one, but two.  As we will prove later,

     Jesus, the son of the New Testament, was also Jehovah, the god of

     Israel, in the Old Testament. Jehovah (or Jesus) was the "other" god, the

     second god, the firstborn of all creation. He was the only god formed,

     and there was no other god formed. The scriptures clearly teach two

     separate gods, not three persons in one god.

 

# This is the first recorded mention of "The God" speaking (Genesis 1:3).

     Simply because The God spoke, the word, or the logos, was the first

     creation in the beginning of all creation.

 

# Now that we have established that the word was the first creation of

     The God, let us return to John 1:1: "the word was with (the) god."

     Although the KJV translators ignored it, the definite article preceding

     "god" is in the Greek manuscript. That clearly indicates that this is the

     invisible creator god.  The word translated with comes from pros,

     which means face-to-face, or in close communion with someone.

     Therefore, the word was a separate entity from The God.

 

# Therefore, we can now understand John 1:1: The God, the invisible god

     of creation, spoke a god, Jehovah, into existence. Jehovah was the word

     of the Old Testament, and he was the constant spokesman for The God.

 

# The Israelites were not even aware that The God existed. They saw

     Jehovah, the instrument of The God, and that instrument, or logos, or

     word, or Jehovah, was designated as the god of Israel.

 

# The word god, elohim, is a generic term, not a proper name, and it does

     not always refer to The God which believers are supposed to worship.

 

# John 1:3 states specifically how the instrument, or word, or Jehovah,

     was used by the invisible god of creation. The God spoke his desires,

     and Jehovah responded by turning those desires into reality.

 

# First, Jehovah was a created god. He was not without beginning or end,

     as is the invisible god. Second, Jehovah was the word of the invisible

     god.  Third, Jehovah, the word, the god of Israel, became Jesus, a man

     of flesh and blood.

 

# The New Testament shows that The God still desires a sacrifice from

     men, but now it is a sacrifice of praise.  And, this current sacrifice is

     offered through the New Testament Jehovah, whom we know as Jesus,

     the Christ.

 

# All are one in Christ Jesus, meaning all are there judicially because of

     his crucifixion, and because of what was done for all by grace, all are

     also heirs. However, not all spend their inheritance wisely, as witnessed

     to by the prodigal son who wasted his inheritance.

 

# When someone was appointed to the priesthood, they were given a

     portion of holy spirit to fit them for the office. This was still true in the

     New Testament, which is why Jesus sent the holy spirit.

 

# We must be careful not to confuse honor with worship. To honor

     means to revere, or hold in deep respect.  Worship in the New

     Testament becomes a matter of the spirit, a different connotation than

     it had in the Old Testament.

 

# The sacrifices described in Leviticus, as well as the Passover described

     in Exodus, point forward to Jesus and show the connection between

     Jehovah and Jesus.

 

# The Israelites did not realize that their sacrifices were only shadows of a

     single future sacrifice which would forgive the sins of the whole world,

     once and for all. The revelation of the invisible god was a gradual,

     continuing thing until the final revelation through Jesus.

 

# If the sacrifices could not take away sin, then what was their purpose?

     They were only a necessity, established for the appeasement of the

     guilty consciences of the people he had created.  It was so the people

     would have a clear conscience and feel free to praise Jehovah and

     rejoice before him.

 

# This is the exact opposite of what is taught in many churches today.

     The common teaching is that these offerings were made because the

     people had sinned and Jehovah must be appeased.  That is not what

     the scriptures say!  Appeasement of a god is the approach of paganism,

     but not the message of the Bible.

 

# The "it" back in Exodus referred to Jesus. This shows the progression of

     the Passover lamb, from first being for one family, to being for all of

     Israel, and finally being enlarged to be the sacrifice for the sins of the

     entire world.

 

# This lamb of the invisible god was the man, Jesus. He was the

     fulfillment of the shadows cast by the Old Testament sacrifices and

     offerings, including that of the Passover lamb. No longer did sacrifices

     need to be made before Jehovah. He had now become the man, Jesus,

     and he had provided himself as a sacrificial lamb to cleanse the

     conscience of all men so they would come directly to their heavenly

     father.

 

# The peace spoken of here is the peace that comes between The God and

     men. Jesus, by his sacrifice, brought that peace, just as it was

     symbolized by the peace offering of the Old Testament.  Therefore, we

     can see that Jesus is set forth in the New Testament as the fulfillment of

     both the Passover and the peace offerings.

 

# The people offering the sacrifices slew the animals, or fowls, themselves.

     This symbolized that the animal was shedding its blood in the place of

     the person offering the sacrifice. They could then feel that their sin had

     been put out of the way, and they could have the joy of being before

     Jehovah without fear.

 

# The priest was the intermediary, and only the priest could take any

     part of the burnt offering (ola) to the altar. It was a sin for anyone else

     to do so. Since this was an offering of joy and reverence, that indicates

     that Jesus was also the fulfillment of this offering.

 

#  The reconciliation of mankind through the death of Jesus, the Christ,

     was looked at through the burnt offering (ola), not so much as an

     offering for sin as it was for the general alienation between men and

     the invisible god of heaven. Hence, reconciliation was the major theme

     of the burnt offering (ola). It was for the purpose of bringing peace and

     joy, or celebration, to the people.

 

# Jesus was the whole burnt offering, the ola kalil, whose blood was taken

     into the holy of holies in the heavens, and the temple there was

     cleansed with his blood.

 

# Even as the trespass offering was for the admitted guiltiness of the

     person, Jesus was the sacrifice which removed this sense of guilt from

     the whole world, and he died for their sin. His blood was poured out

     that they might have eternal life with joy and peace.

 

# This clearly shows that Paul used spendomai in the same sense of the

     drink offering, as a pouring out of one’s life. In the case of Jesus, it was

     the pouring out of his blood which was also a drink offering.

 

# This emphasizes what the wave offerings in the Old Testament were all

     about. They were not only the offering of thanks for the harvest, but as

     explained in the New Testament, they also signified the most important

     harvest of all: the "harvest" of people unto the invisible god of heaven.

 

# The Bible not only shows that Jesus was the fulfillment of all the

     sacrifices and offerings, but it also teaches that there are still sacrifices

     which the follower of Jesus should make. Just as those Old Testament

     sacrifices were made at some cost, the same is true of followers in the

     New Testament.

 

# Paul was saying to the Romans, that as a priest, they should put their

     bodies on the altar as an offering to The God, who gave his son for

     them.  There is no cheap way to serve The God

 

# The priesthood was also a shadow of things to come, of which Jesus was

     the fulfillment.

 

# The New Testament informs us that Jesus was the fulfillment of the

     shadow cast by Jehovah in the Old Testament. He was the fulfillment

     of it precisely because he was that shadow. He was Jehovah, who was

     made flesh, and called by the name of Jesus.

 

# The Old Testament law only cast a shadow, while the New Testament

     revealed the substance which threw that shadow.

 

# The sacrificing of bulls and goats only prefigured, or foreshadowed, the

     death of Jesus, the Christ, whose blood finally did take away the sins of

     mankind forever. Never again would there need to be another sacrifice.

 

# Before, only Israel was set apart by the sacrifices. Now, however, Jesus

     has sanctified the entire human race, and that includes everyone from

     Adam onward!

 

# When the sacrifices and offerings were eliminated, there was no longer

     any need for the priesthood to offer them. Therefore, Jesus was the

     fulfillment of the priesthood, as well as the Old Testament law

     concerning the sacrifices and offerings.

 

# Only the sacrificial laws were done away with, or annulled, by the

     death of Jesus. The ten commandments still stand as a guide for our

     lives, just as they always have since they were given. Jesus did fulfill

     them, but he did not annul them.

 

# Being in the order of Melchizedek meant that Jesus would never need

     to be replaced. He would live forever to intercede for mankind;

     therefore, we need no more sacrifices, no more fallible priesthood, and

     no more tabernacle or temple. 

 

# As long as the original, hand-made tabernacle stood, then the way into

     the heavenly tabernacle was closed to everyone. That first tabernacle

     was only a simile, or something similar to another.

 

# The heavenly tabernacle, of which they knew nothing, must also be

     cleansed with blood. However, only the blood of Jesus was good

     enough for that purpose.

 

# The first veil hung before the holy place. The second veil hung before

     the holy of holies. The third veil was the shekinah glory cloud which hid

     Jehovah. The fourth veil was the body of Jesus, which was the veil

     before the holy of holies in heaven.

 

# The rending of the earthly veil before the holy of holies was the last of

     the shadows cast by the earthly tabernacle. Its usefulness was now

     over. This passage reveals that Jesus was the veil of the heavenly

     tabernacle, and this veil had to be rent before people could approach

     the invisible god. The heavenly veil, Jesus, was rent when he was

     crucified, and his flesh gave up the life that was in it.

 

# After Jesus died, the way to the invisible god of heaven was open.

     Anyone who wished to fellowship with the heavenly father could go in

     through the way Jesus had opened.

 

# We were not elected by ourselves, but only in Christ, who was, and is,

     the only man ever elected by The God (see Luke 23:35). If Jesus, in

     reality, was the christ—which he was—then he was the only one

     chosen by The God. We are only chosen "in him."   Now that we are in

     Christ, he is the supplier of all our needs, both physical and spiritual,

     just as Jehovah was for the Israelites.

 

# When The God acted, it was for the whole of humanity "in Christ Jesus."

     In his own strength, man cannot, and will not, ever bring forth

     righteous works. The God has preordained what those works are, and

     put Jesus in charge of enabling them.  This is why Jesus bestowed a

     portion of holy spirit upon all flesh.

 

# Much of the Old Testament seems to be a parable with the answer

     provided in the New Testament.

 

# The kingdom will be gained only through good works, which are

     based on love and faith of The God, and his son Jesus, thus allowing

     The God to work his will, and thereby producing good works.

 

# When Jesus ascended to the Father in heaven, he would be a life-giving

     spirit, re-assuming, as a glorified man, the office he had previously held

     as Jehovah.

 

# The Israelites did not inherit the promised land because of their own

     righteousness, but because Jehovah had given his word, the covenant.

 

# Because of the scriptures, people now know, or ought to know, that

     both Jehovah and Jesus were only intermediaries between the invisible

     god of heaven and the people. The word of The God was known in the

     Old Testament as Jehovah, who became Jesus, the word of The God in

     the New Testament.

 

# Jesus, as a man, fulfilled all righteousness, and this qualified him to

     judge the whole world in righteousness. This will occur when Jesus

     returns to earth to usher in the kingdom of The God.

 

# After his resurrection and ascension, Jesus was again given all the

     authority he had as Jehovah in the Old Testament. That authority

     included everything in heaven and on earth. He was made both lord,

     and christ, or messiah. But, now, instead of being only a spirit, he was

     a glorified man, with all the authority, or power. He had become what

     the first Adam had lost.

 

# Prior to the death of Jesus, no man had ever entered into the presence

     of the invisible god of heaven.  Jesus not only opened the way, he also

     revealed the previously unknown presence of the invisible god of

     heaven, his father. 

 

# There are few teachers today who understand the difference between

     scripture and denominational doctrine.  There are even fewer who will

     declare the truth of scripture when it conflicts with denominational

     doctrine.

 

# The church is not The God, and it is The God who calls teachers!

 

# Paul affirms that Jehovah’s covenant is now in the hands of Jesus, the

     Christ, who now administers it to the people.

 

# Israel is a metaphor for the kingdom of God.

 

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Attributes shared by Jehovah and Jesus

 

# Jehovah gave life in the Old Testament, and Jesus bestowed life in the

     New Testament.

 

# Jehovah judged all men by covering the earth with a flood.  Jesus, the

     New Testament Jehovah, has been given all judgment over men.

 

# Jehovah guided his people in the Old Testament, and Jesus, the New

     Testament Jehovah, is still guiding his people in this age.

 

# The scriptures clearly show that Jehovah was god almighty in the Old

     Testament, while it is Jesus who is lord, or god almighty, in the New

     Testament.

 

# The statement ("The lord (is) a helper to me, and I will not be afraid:

     what shall man do to me?") was attributed to Jehovah in the Old

     Testament, but also to Jesus in the New Testament, thereby equating

     the two.

 

# Jehovah saved physically in the Old Testament, and Jesus saved

     spiritually in the New Testament.  In Exodus, people escaped with their

     physical lives from Egypt, which often symbolizes sin. In John, the

     lamb of The God took away the sin of the world in such a manner that

     it will neither be imputed nor punished.

 

# Jehovah gave holy spirit to those he appointed to be priests, and Jesus

     poured out some of holy spirit upon everyone.

 

# There are many scripture references which either equate Jehovah and

     Jesus, or which show that the two were closely allied.

 

# Now that we are in Christ, he is the supplier of all our needs, both

     physical and spiritual, just as Jehovah was for the Israelites.

 

# Just as Jehovah of the Old Testament guided his people, Jesus of the

     New Testament will guide all men into the path which is pleasing to

     The God.

 

# The invisible god of heaven guides the actions of Jesus, just as he did for

     Jehovah.

 

# Jehovah was the one in charge of holy spirit, and he bestowed it upon

     whomsoever he chose for a special work.  In the New Testament, Jesus,

     Jehovah become flesh, is still in charge of holy spirit. Jesus, through

     himself, has chosen everyone to do a special work for the invisible god

     of heaven.

 

# Jehovah, in the Old Testament, poured out holy spirit on whom he

     chose, enabling them to fulfill his desires. Jesus, likewise, has charge of

     holy spirit, and poured it out upon everyone, enabling them to fulfill

     their charge.

 

# Both Jehovah and Jesus were declared as king forever.

 

# Again, that which was attributed to Jehovah in the Old Testament, was

     attributed to Jesus in the New Testament. Jehovah was the truth before

     becoming flesh, he was still the truth as the man, Jesus.

 

# Just as Jehovah in Old Testament times determined which people

     received some of the spirit, Jesus, again at the right hand of the invisible

     god of heaven, was given control over the disposition of holy spirit. This

     time, however, some of it was given to all flesh, or all men.

 

 

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October 2009

 

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