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What Scripture Says About Salvation

A Bible Study by Fred Kenison

 

Monograph 8:  Holiness


 

 

Hagiazo (holy as a verb)

Hagios (holy as an adjective)

Hagiotes, hagiosune, and hagiasmos (holy as a noun)

Hagnos and hagnotes

Hosios and hosiotes

 

Summary Highlights of Monograph 8

 

 

The words holiness and sanctification are both translated from the same Greek word.  They have a variety of meanings to different denominations and to different people, whether churched or unchurched.

 

Many believe that sanctification is an experience accomplished through "going forward" for prayer by the pastor, the elders, or others in the church.  In some churches, this leads to the assumption that people who participate in this ritual are "sanctified holy" and will no longer sin because they are now able to live without sinning.  This misconception causes much discouragement, in addition to outright error.

 

Others believe they are "sanctified" when they receive one or more "gifts of the holy spirit," usually the gift of "speaking in tongues."  This at least approaches the true meaning of holiness, or sanctification, since it usually separates the one experiencing "tongues" from others who do not have the same experience.  Unfortunately, this often labels some as more spiritual than others, leading to the spiritual gnosticism John warned about in his first epistle.  While the word holiness, or sanctification, literally means separation, it does not mean that some people are more spiritual than others.

 

The five Greek words hagios, hagiosmos, hagiotes, hagiosune, and hagiazo are all derived from the same root, hagosHagios, an adjective, means someone or something has been separated to, or from, something else.  In the Old Testament, altars, the ark, and other items were separated, or consecrated, to God. 

 

In the New Testament, hagios is normally translated as holy, which carries the same connotation as the Old Testament usage, simply that those spoken of as holy, or sanctified, are separated ones.  When hagios is used in the plural, the most common translation is "saints," holy (ones), where the word "ones" is not actually in the manuscript but supplied by the reader. 


Hagiosmos, hagiotes, and hagiosune are nouns.   Hagiosmos is normally translated as holiness or sanctification; hagiotes, which is used only in Hebrews 12:10, is translated as holiness; and, hagiosune, is also translated predominantly as holiness.

 

The fifth word, hagiazo, is a verb, which means to make, or render, someone or something to be holy, hallowed, or sanctified.  In the strict definition of the word, a person or thing spoken of as being holy, may only be considered as separated or consecrated to God.

 

None of these definitions include the issue of morality, although that is the common connotation today.  When people say someone is holy, or that someone is a saint, they usually mean that the person is very moral, or has a superior spiritual goodness. 

 

As this study will show, the Bible refers to people being made holy without their active participation.  Whether or not a person is holy actually has more to do with association and position  than it does with conduct.  A person may be sanctified, or holy (set apart to God), and still be immoral.

 

This naturally raises some questions.  How are people sanctified?   Can people know for certain whether or not they are sanctified, or holy?  What action, if any, is necessary on their part to become sanctified, or holy?  Who, or what, makes people holy?  What evidence definitely shows that people have been sanctified, or made holy?  Does morality indicate sanctification or holiness?  Does speaking in tongues indicate holiness, or sanctification?

 

There are also two other similar words, which have different meanings.  The adjective hagnos and the noun form hagnotes, essentially refer to the condition of the body, such as purity, chastity, and keeping the body undefiled.  These latter two words (hagnos and hagnotes) actually mean what most people mistakenly believe the first five words mean. 

 

The first group of five words (hagios, hagiosmos, hagiotes, hagiosune, hagiazo), by far the most numerous in usage (274 times), have to do with position, separation from something to something.  The second group of two words (hagnos, hagnotes) indicates morality or purity, and they are used far less (10 times) than the first group of five words.

 

Just to confuse issues further, we need to consider two more words-hosios and hosiotesHosios, an adjective, is derived from the Hebrew word chasid, which is usually translated in the Old Testament as merciful, or someone who has no malice.  In the New Testament, hosios is translated as holy. 

 

The noun form, hosiotes, is also translated as holiness.  These two words are used to indicate an intrinsic holiness, or purity.  In total, however, these two words are only used 10 times in the New Testament.  The Bible is rather stingy in calling people holy in the moral sense of the word, at least in the New Testament.  These terms are usually applied to God, or to Jesus.

 

Trench (p. 333) gives a good example of the different groups of Greek words and their uses in the following quote. 

"If what has been said is correct, Joseph, when tempted to sin by his Egyptian mistress (Gen. 39:7:12) approved himself as hosios, in reverencing those everlasting sanctities of the marriage bond, which God had founded, and which he could not violate without sinning against Him: 'How can I do this great wickedness and sin against God?'  He approved himself hagios in that he separated himself from any unholy fellowship with his temptress; he approved himself hagnos in that he kept his body pure and undefiled."

 

Joseph's righteousness, or righteous actions, in this example, found their source in a pious heart.  Joseph's faith in God and his precepts gave impetus to his good deeds.

 

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Hagiazo (holy as a verb)

 

Hagiazo, the verb form of hagios, and its derivatives are usually translated as sanctify, sanctifies, and sanctified.  Matthew 23:17-19 says,

"Ye fools and blind: for whether is greater, the gold, or the temple that sanctifieth the gold?  And, Whosoever shall swear by the altar, it is nothing; but whosoever sweareth by the gift that is upon it, he is guilty.  Ye fools and blind: for whether is greater, the gift, or the altar that sanctifieth the gift?" 

 

The word sanctifies (hagiazon) is a present active participle, which indicates continuous action.  So the altar spoken of is continually sanctifying the gifts upon it.  A gift of gold cannot be accused of sin, so the word sanctify is simply denoting that something is being consecrated, or set apart to God.  The gift is certainly not being changed from something sinful to something which is not sinful.  It is being set apart to God, or dedicated to him.

 

Things, as well as people, can be sanctified, or set apart to God.  Jesus was delivering a lesson to the Pharisees about something which they should have known.  For example, Exodus 29:37 says,

"Seven days thou shalt make an atonement for the altar, and sanctify it; and it shall be an altar most holy: whatsoever toucheth the altar shall be holy." 

 

The verb is in the active mood, which means that it was the altar which sanctified and acted, not the gifts upon it.  The gifts were inactive in the process.

 

In John 10:36, Jesus said,

"Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?" 

 

Again, the verb is active, which shows that God sanctified, set apart, his son for his own purposes.  In this case, being sanctified did not mean becoming sinless because Jesus had no sin.  There has to be another meaning.  This raises a question of whether men might be sanctified in the same manner?

 

In John 17:14-19, Jesus said,

"I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.  I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world, but that thou shouldest keep them from the evil.  They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.  Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth.  As thou hast sent me into the world, even so have I also sent them into the world.  And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth."

 

In verse 17:14, the word sanctify is an aorist imperative active, which means to start, or begin to sanctify them in (by) thy truth.  Notice that Jesus was only now asking the Father to set apart (sanctify) his disciples in truth.  Evidently, although they had followed him so far, this had not yet occurred. 

 

Jesus continued, in verse 17:19, by saying that he sanctifies, or sets apart, or separates himself.  To what?  According to the context of this chapter, it was to his crucifixion.  As he went to the garden to pray, he was betrayed and captured.

 

Again, in verse 17:19, the word sanctify is a perfect passive participle. The perfect indicates that sanctification is completed, but the effects will continue on into the future.  The passive means that the disciples were not active in the process of sanctification; it was done by the Father. 

 

If the word of God, the truth, is believed and obeyed, it will continuously set one apart, or separate that one to God, at least in this life.  It is God who is asked to separate, or to sanctify, them.  They were just there; God acted upon them.

 

In Acts 20:32, during his discourse to the elders, Paul used the passive sense of sanctified: 

"And now, brethren, I commend you to God, and to the word of his grace, which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance among all them which are sanctified." 

 

This, again, was in the perfect voice which means their sanctification had taken place previously and the effects were continuing.  Note that it was the word of God which did the sanctifying.  The word is powerful; it builds up, it provides an inheritance, it sanctifies in truth.

 

Acts 26:18, describing Paul's experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, quoted Jesus as saying he was sending Paul,

"To open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith that is in me." 

 

Paul had previously shown that men are sanctified by God through the word.  Now, he brought in a new element.  Faith in Jesus, of course, comes by God's word of grace as a gift, not a work of men.

 

As an aside, many believe that Acts 26:18 indicates that when people turn to God, then God forgives their sins if they have faith in Jesus.  The word receive comes from labein, an active infinitive, which shows that the people are acting, not God.  The English infinitive would be "to receive." 

 

Therefore, when men turn to God, they are enabled to receive the truth that God has already forgiven their sins.  God does not forgive their sins when, or because, they believe, or turn to him.  However, turning to God does enable them to accept the truth of what God has already done.

 

Paul was saying that when men have "faith that is in me," they are then able to acknowledge that God, through the death of Jesus, has already forgiven them, and also that they have an inheritance as one who has been sanctified, or set apart by that faith. 

 

The words faith in me come from pistei eis eme.  The word eis is accusative and shows motion toward the word "me."  It could be translated as "faith which shows motion, toward, or into me," or Jesus.  Again, it is God who sanctifies, which is one of God's graces, or gifts, to men.

 

In Romans 15:15-16, Paul said,

"Nevertheless, brethren, I have written the more boldly unto you in some sort, as putting you in mind, because of the grace that is given to me of God,  That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, ministering the gospel of God, that the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost." 

 

This passage is better expressed by Berry:

"More boldly but I did write to you, brethren, in part, as reminding you, because of the grace which was given to me by God, for to be me a minister of Jesus Christ to the nations, administering in sacred service the glad tidings of God, that might be the offering up of the nations acceptable, sanctified by spirit holy."

 

In the Greek manuscript, there is no definite article used with pneumati hagios, which shifts the emphasis to quality, or shows that it is a general, not a specific, being spoken of.  In other words, they are to be sanctified by "a holy spirit," not "the holy spirit."  Their attitude of love was to be the spirit which set them apart, or sanctified them, from the world. 

 

This should also be the aim of any who share the gospel with others: that they, too, may be set apart by a spirit of love in their lives and action, thereby becoming the sacrifice offered by those who shared the gospel with them.  The word sanctified in this scripture is also passive, the spirit of the people is what sets them apart.

 

In I Corinthians 1:2-3, Paul wrote,

"Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours.  Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

 

These are the ones set apart in Jesus Christ.  The words "in Jesus Christ" show the location of these saints, or separated ones.  They are separated into Jesus Christ, and Paul was bringing greetings of grace and peace from God.  The word sanctified is passive, indicating that being in Christ, judicially, was accomplished not by what they had done, but what Jesus did for them.

 

In I Corinthians 6:9-11, Paul chastised the Corinthian believers because they had not laid aside their old practices of worshiping pagan gods.  He said that God is not, and never will be, pleased with such things, and if they continue such practices, they will not enter the coming Kingdom of God.  

"Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind, Nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God.  And such were some of you: but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God."

 

Whenever the scriptures say "in the name of Jesus Christ," it means everything that his name entails, including his life, death, and resurrection.  That is what put these people "in him."  They were passive; they had nothing to do with it.  When Jesus died, God set all men in him, judicially.  This was another grace, or gift, from God to humanity.

 

The word sanctified in this scripture is aorist indicative passive, which means that this had already happened and Paul was simply telling them what had occurred.  It was an historical event, already completed.  The aorist indicative shows it was in the past, and the passive shows that the people were inactive in the process.  They were set apart, or sanctified, in the spirit of our God.

 

I John 5:6 says, "the Spirit is (the) truth."  Again, we see that people are set apart in truth. 

 

You may have noticed in the scriptures quoted that some of them say "by the spirit of our God," and others say "in the spirit of our God."  The reason is that both "in" and "by" were translated from the word en.  This means that "by" and "in" could be used interchangeably: "in the name, by the spirit" or "by the name, in the spirit."  One could assume we are placed in the name of Jesus by God and somehow sanctified by the spirit.  Actually, only God sanctifies or sets one apart.  He put us judicially "in" what Jesus did for us and also "in" the holy spirit.  Both are positional and not conditional. 

 

The Greek article, en, always retains the sense of location even though it may be given various translations.  For instance, Matthew 26:52: 

"Then said Jesus unto him, Put up again thy sword into his place: for all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword." 

 

The word with comes from en.  The writer was using en in the sense of location when he said the power of death abided "in" the sword.  Therefore, when the scriptures say we are "in the name of Jesus Christ," it simply means that all he has done for our salvation has become ours.  We have been placed within the shelter of his works and faithfulness.

 

David was acutely aware of this as evidenced by his comments in the Psalms.  For instance, Psalms 18:1-2 says,

"I will love thee, O Lord, my strength.  The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower." 

 

David obviously knew he was "in" the Lord.  How great it would be if more people knew this today!

 

In I Corinthians 7:14, Paul said,

"For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband: else were your children unclean; but now are they holy." 

 

Again, the word sanctify is passive.  The unbelieving spouse, either man or woman, is set apart in the influence of the believer.  If the believer acts in a manner which shows God's love, it will almost certainly have an influence on the unbeliever.

 

In II Timothy 2:20-21, Paul also used the perfect passive in verse 21 when he drew an analogy between vessels in a rich man's house and different kinds of people in the Lord's house. 

"But in a great house there are not only vessels of gold and of silver, but also of wood and of earth; and some to honour, and some to dishonour.  If a man therefore purge himself from these, he shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the master's use, and prepared unto every good work." 

 

A man can only "purge himself" by looking to the Lord for the necessary power.  When we allow God to purge, or cleanse us, we are then fit for a better use than if we continue to live under law, or in the flesh. 

 

Then, in verses 2:22-26, Paul listed some of the things involved in this purging process: 

"Flee also youthful lusts: but follow righteousness, faith, charity, peace, with them that call on the Lord out of a pure heart.  But foolish and unlearned questions avoid, knowing that they do gender strifes.  And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient,  In meekness instructing those that oppose themselves; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth;  And that they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil, who are taken captive by him at his will." 

 

This is the first verse to address the practical problem of how to be sanctified in our daily lives.

 

Hebrews contains further knowledge about being sanctified in our daily lives.  Hebrews 2:11 says,

"For both he that [continuously] sanctifieth and they who are [continuously] sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren." 

 

This is not dealing with the judicial aspect of being sanctified which sprang from the work and faithfulness of Jesus Christ, but with the power (and its source) for sanctified people to live a separated, or sanctified daily life.  The word "continuously" was inserted in the above scripture to indicate the impact of the present tense of the word sanctified used here.  Again, sanctified is passive.

 

This scripture clearly states that Jesus is the one who is continuously doing the sanctifying.  As Paul stated in Romans 5:10,

"we shall be saved by his life." 

 

Because both Jesus and the sanctified ones are all out of God, Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers.  In Hebrews 2:13, he also calls them,

"the children which God hath given me." 

 

Jesus is our Lord, and by his authority he becomes the one who sanctifies us in our daily lives.  Also, it is Jesus who is the Lord of our experiential sanctification as we live hour by hour.

 

Hebrews 9:11-14 says,

"But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building;  Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us.  For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh:  How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God?"

 

This scripture shows that it is necessary to have our consciences purged in order to abandon dead (law) works and serve God.  This was accomplished by Jesus Christ who was the proper sacrifice.  Our faith in this offering sets our conscience apart from (purges, sanctifies) law works, which was something the blood of bulls and goats could only do for the flesh.  Jesus Christ is the "much more." 

 

The word sanctifies in this passage is active.  Just as the blood of the sacrifices did the setting apart, or sanctifying, the blood of Jesus, or his death, did the same for our consciences.

 

Hebrews 10:9-10 again refers to the judicial aspect of our sanctification. 

"Then said he, Lo, I come to do thy will, O God. He taketh away the first, that he may establish the second.  By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all." 

 

The word sanctified is a perfect passive, which means it has already come to a conclusion and the effects continue.  Again, the passive shows that this was done for us, and we were not active in the process.  Only Jesus could do this for us, and because he did, we have once for all (time) been sanctified by this offering and the effects continue.  God willed it, Jesus did it, and we are the beneficiaries.  Talk about grace!

 

Hebrews 10:28-29 warns about living in rebellion to God who sanctified us with the blood of Jesus. 

"He that despised Moses' law died without mercy under two or three witnesses:  Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace?" 

 

The grace of God cost him his son, and we must never take that lightly!

 

The writer of Hebrews returned to the judicial aspect of sanctification in 13:12. 

"Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate." 

 

The words "might sanctify" are written in the aorist subjunctive active, which does not have the same sense that "might" would have in English.  It is not a matter of maybe, implied in English, but a definite, no maybe about it.  We know that he did die and we know that we were sanctified, or set apart to God by his death.  We had nothing to do with this judicial aspect of being sanctified.  It was a judgment made by God when he acted as a judge.

 

Jude 1:1 is another verse that uses the passive verb, sanctified. 

"Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by [en] God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called." 

 

This verse says that men were set apart in God the Father.  The Greek again shows the locative en, which the KJV translated as "by," which would be instrumental.  The instrumental is probably also correct in one way as sanctification finds its source in God, and it is he who actually sets men apart, or sanctifies them.

 

I Peter 3:14-15 is one of the rare verses in which men are active in the process of sanctifying. 

"But and if ye suffer for righteousness' sake, happy are ye: and be not afraid of their terror, neither be troubled;  But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear." 

 

God and Jesus are active in the process of sanctifying us, but only we can set God apart in our hearts even as we have been set apart in God, in truth, in holy spirit, in Jesus Christ, in the name of Jesus Christ, in the spirit of our God, by the work of Jesus.  All this is being done by God and Jesus, constantly forever.

 

In Ephesians 5:25-27, Paul spoke of the church being sanctified. 

"Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it;  That he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word,  That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish." 

 

The words "might sanctify" and "might present" are both in the aorist subjunctive active which conveys no sense of maybe, but a sense of purpose and certainty.  The assembly will be presented to himself, and it will be sanctified.

 

I Thessalonians 5:23 contains Paul's prayer: 

"And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ."

 

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Hagios (holy as an adjective)

 

Our study of hagiazo, sanctify, showed that the basic definition of sanctify is to set apart, or separate to or from one position to another.  In studying the adjective, hagios, holy, we will use the words "set apart" or "separated" to denote the meaning of the word.  By doing so, we hope this will help avoid confusion with various religious meanings currently in use.

 

Hagios simply means "the set apart one," or when translated in the plural, "saints" or "the saints."  Saints are those who have been judicially set apart by God to himself.  In this context, it has no connotation of morality.  If any significance of morality occurs with the word "holy," it must be found in the context.  Other Greek words are used to denote morality, but as previously stated, they are used sparingly, as our study will show.

 

This section begins with scriptures concerning things.  Nothing of a moral character can possibly be connected with inanimate objects, but such objects can be made holy (set apart) to God.  However, we must be aware of the distinction between what the word "holy" means in the scriptures, and how the word "sacred" is used in pagan religions. 

 

Saying something is sacred means it has value, religious value, above any other object of its kind.  The word "holy" is used in the scriptures to mean something is set apart to God, but that does not indicate that it has any more religious value than any other similar object.

 

Instead of using the word "sacred," some people now use the word "Christian" to indicate the same thing.  It is both absurd and illogical to describe movies, books, records, and other inanimate objects as "Christian."  If they had been set apart to God, perhaps they would be holy, or separated, for some purpose, but they would never be "Christian." 

 

Jerusalem is often referred to as the "holy city" because it was chosen by God and set apart for his peculiar use.  The concept of morality or immorality is irrelevant; it was simply set apart, or holy.

 

Another common distortion is to use the word "holy" to indicate "pious" or "spiritual" behavior.  The latter is usually determined by the amount of emotion involved.  But, to repeat, the scriptural definition of holy is simply something (deed, thing, person) set apart or dedicated to God.  If speaking of behavior, it would usually be an act of love, or those actions done for the love of God, or love for other people.

 

In Luke 1:49, Mary refers to a name as holy: 

"For he that is mighty hath done to me great things; and holy is his name." 

 

His name is holy because it is more exalted than any other name could possibly be!  He has a name set apart from any other.  Luke 1:72 talks about his "holy covenant," a covenant set apart from any other.  There is no other like it!

 

Acts 7:33 speaks of holy ground:

"Then said the Lord to him, Put off thy shoes from thy feet: for the place where thou standest is holy ground." 

 

In Romans, Paul wrote about the holy scriptures (1:2); the holy law and commandments (7:12); the first fruits as holy and the root as holy (11:16), and a holy kiss (16:16).  Paul also spoke of a holy temple (I Corinthians 3:17, Ephesians 2:21), and a holy calling (II Timothy 1:9).  Peter refers to a holy mountain (II Peter 1:18) and holy conversation (II Peter 3:11), which would be that set apart to God.  Other scriptures refer to the most holy faith (Jude 1:20), and a (holy) city, the New Jerusalem, coming down from God (Revelation 21:2).

 

Several scriptures describe people as set apart, or holy.  This does not mean that such people are more pious, or more moral, or more religious than others.  It means only that they were set apart for some particular purpose.  There were set apart angels (Matthew 25:31) and prophets set apart for God's service (Luke 1:70). 

 

Luke 2:23 says,

"(As it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord;)" 

 

and in Romans 12:1, Paul wrote,

"I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service."

 

Ephesians 1:3-4, one of Paul's eulogies to God, mentions that people are holy:

"Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ:  According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love." 

 

In Ephesians 5:27, he wrote,

"That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish." 

 

Many proclaim that the church is to be sinless rather than set apart, which creates confusion over the meaning of the word hagios.

 

In Colossians 1:21-22, Paul wrote,

"And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled  In the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight." 

 

Notice that this was by the grace of God, through the sacrifice of Jesus, and not by the works or actions of men.

 

In Colossians 3:12, as Paul began his discourse on how the "set apart ones" should behave, he said,

"Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, longsuffering." 

 

When people come to the knowledge that God in his grace has set them apart, or made them holy, then they should be ready to serve him in love.  Obeying God is not akin to keeping the law, but it is necessary to reap the most from this life and the life to come.

 

In passing, notice that Paul spoke of the bowels as the seat of various emotions.  Today, we consider the heart as the seat of the emotions, while in Paul's day, the heart was considered to be the seat of the will.  Many scriptures have been terribly misinterpreted because of ignorance about this point.  To serve God requires an act of the will, not just an emotional response.  All too often, the emphasis is on the emotion surrounding "conversion" or "repentance."

 

Peter, in his first epistle, used the word hagios four times. 

"But as he which hath called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation;  Because it is written, Be ye holy; for I am holy." (1:15-16). 

 

This scripture takes on a whole new meaning when the words "set apart" are substituted for "holy."  In other words, "But as he which hath called you is set apart, so be ye set apart in all manner of conversation [in your conduct];  because it is written, Be ye set apart; for I am set apart."  We should be set apart from evil works, just as God is set apart from evil works.

 

Peter spoke of the "set apart" priesthood (I Peter 2:5), and the "set apart" nation (I Peter 2:9).  Jude 1:20-21 says,

"But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost,  Keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life." 

 

Our faith is something that has also been given to us by God, or set apart to us.

 

It should be clear by now that the basic idea of the word hagios, holy, means set apart; it is a matter of position rather than the moral character of those set apart.  They may or may not display good character.  All mankind was set apart by the death of Jesus, and some men certainly display unsavory character and immoral behavior.

 

Hagioi, the plural of hagios, when accompanied with the definite article, oi, is usually translated as saints.  I Corinthians 6:2 says,

"Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? and if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matters?" 

 

This is no doubt one of the future duties of the "set apart ones."  Paul was telling them that in the light of this, they should be able to make some of the small judgments in this life. 

 

However, please note that Paul was also speaking about a future event to take place in the next age, the Kingdom of God.  Everyone may be "set apart ones" now, but there will be another "setting apart" which takes place at the coming of Jesus Christ.  Those who are set apart at the coming of Christ will be the saints, or set apart ones, who will judge the world.

 

Ephesians 1:15-20 also looks to the future: 

"Wherefore I also, after I heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus, and love unto all the saints,  Cease not to give thanks for you, making mention of you in my prayers;  That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him:  The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,  And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power,  Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places.  Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come." 

 

This shows how "set apart" Jesus is, and how "set apart" the overcoming ones will be at his coming as they will be with him.  This will take place in the future.

 

In Ephesians 4:12-14, Paul told why God has given the church apostles, prophets, evangelists, shepherds, and teachers.  In his words, it was,

"For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ:  Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ:  That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive." 

 

One mark of our time seems to be the systematizing of error Paul spoke of in these verses.  Anything will do as long as it supports our pet church doctrines.

 

Peter referred to what Paul taught concerning the result of distortions.  II Peter 3:16 says,

"As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction." 

 

The purpose of the church and its ministries should be developing the set apart ones so they will be considered worthy to enter the Kingdom of God at the coming of the Christ.

 

Paul developed this thought in Ephesians 5:1-5: 

"Be ye therefore followers of God, as dear children;  And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour.  But fornication, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not be once named among you, as becometh saints;  Neither filthiness, nor foolish talking, nor jesting, which are not convenient: but rather giving of thanks.  For this ye know, that no whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God." 

 

The set apart ones are cautioned to walk in love in this life as a preparation for the next age, or Kingdom of Christ and God.

 

Paul constantly reminded people that all men had been set apart, that they have an inheritance which can be lost by an ungodly life.  Colossians 1:12 says,

"Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light:  Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:" 

 

Paul spoke of those people who allow themselves to be made competent for their share of the inheritance as though they were already in the coming kingdom of the Son.

 

Paul and the apostles followed the example of Jesus and often spoke of something which is a future certainty as though it had already happened.  A good example is John 17:11 where Jesus, looking forward to his death and resurrection as a certainty, said,

"And now I am no more in the world, but these are in the world, and I come to thee."

 

At the coming of the Christ, the set apart ones who allow the power of God to reign freely in their lives will share his reign with him-this is a certainty.  The set apart ones who do not allow God to reign freely in their lives, will not reign with Christ.

 

Romans 11:16-22 contains Paul's warning to those who prided themselves for being over the Jews: 

"For if the firstfruit be holy, the lump is also holy: and if the root be holy, so are the branches.  And if some of the branches be broken off, and thou, being a wild olive tree, wert grafted in among them, and with them partakest of the root and fatness of the olive tree;  Boast not against the branches. But if thou boast, thou bearest not the root, but the root thee.  Thou wilt say then, The branches were broken off, that I might be grafted in.  Well; because of unbelief they were broken off, and thou standest by faith. Be not highminded, but fear:  For if God spared not the natural branches, take heed lest he also spare not thee.  Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off." 

 

Some of the scriptures concerning the set apart ones definitely point to the future.  There is a future "setting apart" which will occur at the coming of the Christ, which is the consummation of our inheritance.  Although all are heirs, not all will meet the requirements for coming into their inheritance. 

 

This is what Paul was warning about in the above scriptures.  Men are grafted in by grace (saved), but their continued salvation depends upon their faith and behavior.

 

Paul pursued this thought further in II Thessalonians 1:7-10: 

"And to you who are troubled rest with us, when the Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels,  In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ:  Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power;  When he shall come to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all them that believe (because our testimony among you was believed) in that day."

 

In the earlier section on hagios, we  purposely postponed the discussion of Revelation  20:6: 

"Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection: on such the second death hath no power, but they shall be priests of God and of Christ, and shall reign with him a thousand years." 

 

This is really being set apart!  What a blessing it will be to be set apart to enter the kingdom and reign with Jesus.  This verse clearly shows just what men have been set apart to: the kingdom of God.  This is God's real purpose in all the setting apart, as well as the real meaning of being holy, or set apart ones.

 

The most frequent use of the word hagios (holy, set apart) is in conjunction with pneuma, spirit, or holy spirit.  Most people have never questioned why the spirit is called holy, although by now the discerning reader could probably answer that question.  The scriptures tell us why.  For example, in John 16:7-14, Jesus said,

"Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.  And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment:  Of sin, because they believe not on me;  Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye see me no more;  Of judgment, because the prince of this world is judged.  I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now.  Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will show you things to come.  He shall glorify me: for he shall receive of mine, and shall show it unto you."

 

John 14:16-17 says,

"And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever; Even the Spirit of truth." 

 

John 15:26 says,

"But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me." 

 

Acts 2:3-4 says,

"And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them.  And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance." 

 

All these scriptures show that the spirit was set apart for specific purposes and, therefore, is referred to as the holy (set apart) spirit, just as the prophets were spoken of as being holy, or set apart.

 

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Hagiotes, hagiosune, and hagiasmos (holy as a noun)

 

The three noun forms of the word hagios (hagiotes, hagiosune, hagiasmos) are usually translated as holiness or sanctification. 

 

For the purpose of our study, we will translate all three words as "separation" in order to avoid confusion.  Many religious groups translate the words "holiness" and "sanctification" to signify something as moral or saintly.  We do not want to perpetuate this error.  Such groups confuse the intended results of our separation with the separation itself.  They mistakenly use the intended results to define the term.

 

Romans 1:4 says,

"And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead." 

 

The word hagiosune is translated here as holiness.  Substituting the word "separation" would render this verse: 

"[Jesus] who was marked out Son of God in power, according to [a] spirit of separation, by resurrection of [the] dead." (Berry). 

 

The definite article was not used before spirit since it does not occur in the Greek, which means this should be translated as an indefinite spirit, or a spirit, not the spirit.

 

Jesus was marked out the Son of God because of his spirit of separation to the ministry of being the sacrifice for the sins of all men.  That he was successful was demonstrated by the fact that he was raised from among the dead ones.  He was the first to show others about the "out resurrection."  [For further details, see the next section, Monograph 9 in this study.]

 

Jesus was faithful to his calling, or his separation unto death.  Those who partake of the resurrection will also participate with Jesus in the kingdom.

 

Hebrews 12:10 says,

"For they verily for a few days chastened us after their own pleasure; but he for our profit, that we might be partakers of his holiness." 

 

God's desire is for everyone to participate in his coming Kingdom, but Scripture teaches us that those who disregard him and live in rebellion will not enter.  I Thessalonians 3:13 states it this way: 

"To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness [separation] before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints."

 

The ultimate aim of separation, or holiness, is to be with the christ.

 

Romans 6:19 says,

"I speak after the manner of men because of the infirmity of your flesh: for as ye have yielded your members servants to uncleanness and to iniquity unto iniquity; even so now yield your members servants to righteousness unto holiness." 

 

Our part is to yield to God so our members may be used for righteous deeds which will allow entry into the kingdom, which is the aim of separation.

 

Romans 6:22 says,

"But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life." 

 

Separation out from among the dead ones, the disobedient, is reserved for those whose lives have been animated and guided by God.  The reward is eternal (God-like) lives and spending the next age with Jesus, the Christ.

 

Everything has already been worked out by God.  Our part is to submit our bodies to him so he can also work everything out in our lives.  I Corinthians 1:30 says,

"But of him [God] are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us [the ground of] wisdom, and [the ground of] righteousness, and [the ground of] sanctification, and [the ground of] redemption." 

 

God laid the foundation fully of grace.  By simply not being disobedient or unbelieving, any person may enter the Kingdom, be separated, or sanctified.  The great separation, or sanctification, which is the Kingdom, is also received by grace from this groundwork spoken of above.  Our part, in the light of this hope, is to

"cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness [separation] in the fear of God." (II Corinthians 7:1).

 

I Thessalonians also talks about this cleansing: 

"For this is the will of God, even your sanctification, that ye should abstain from fornication." (4:3)  "For God hath not called us unto uncleanness, but unto holiness." (4:7) 

 

The fruit God expects from those he has separated is what many mistakenly define as sanctification itself.  God sanctified us (made us holy, set us apart) to bear the fruit he expected.  He has planted us in the christ, the word, the truth, and spirit.  Everything necessary for us to bear the proper fruit has been done for us, except the yielding of our bodies, which is our reasonable service and which only we can do.

 

God does not require that we yield to him, he only requests that we do so.  Those who do yield are winners; those who do not are losers who will miss the separation (sanctification) at the coming of the Lord. 

 

Hebrews 12:14 follows this line of thought. 

"Follow [pursue] peace with all men, and [follow] holiness [separation], without which no man shall see the Lord." 

 

Note, it is not being without sanctification, or separation, which will cause man not to see the Lord, but not following separation.  God has set everyone apart, therefore everyone should follow that separation.  Some will; but, unfortunately, some will not.

 

I Peter 1:2 also emphasizes obedience, or following. 

"Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied." 

 

Again, the definite article does not appear before "spirit" in this verse.  The correct translation should be a prepositional phrase "of spirit" used as an adjective, "a spiritual separation."  [As a note of explanation, the English may say, "a garden of beauty."  But, when "of beauty" is used as an adjective, instead of a prepositional phrase, it becomes "a beautiful garden."] 

 

In other words, God has provided everyone a spiritual separation, or sanctification.  He has set our spirits and our minds apart to his service.

 

Too many people, trying to perfect the flesh as well as the mind, forget what Paul stated in Romans 7:25: 

"I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin." 

 

This scripture is commonly skipped over.  Most of Christianity seems to be focused upon a moralistic system instead of a faith system, and seldom teaches this powerful point.

 

II Thessalonians 2:13 says that,

"God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit [spiritual separation] and belief of the truth:  Whereunto he called you by our gospel, to the obtaining of the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ." 

 

Again the phrase "of spirit," without the definite article, should be translated as "spiritual separation."  It was God's doing from the beginning to set us apart, not ours.

 

We hope this study has clarified the point that the definition of holy refers to position, not to qualities such as morality, piety, or godliness.  The true meaning of the word reveals that our position is a blessing from God.  And, God expects us to bear fruit (such as morality, piety, and godliness) which will result in our entering the kingdom of God when Jesus Christ returns.

 

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Hagnos and hagnotes

 

Both hagnos and hagnotes are translated as holy, chaste, and pure.  The word hagnos, an adjective, and its derivative hagnotes, a noun, are from the same older Greek root as the word hagios.  However, when applied to men, these words denote purity and chastity instead of position (as did hagios). 

 

These two words were used very little in the New Testament; hagnos appears nine times, and hagnotes only once, where it is translated as pureness (II Corinthians 6:6).  Both hagnos and hagnotes speak of the outward condition of men, their conduct, and the use of their bodies.

 

Hagnotes denotes quality, not position.   In II Corinthians 6:3-10, Paul listed some of the fruits described in the study of hagios

"Giving no offence in any thing, that the ministry be not blamed:  But in all things approving ourselves as the ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,  In stripes, in imprisonments, in tumults, in labours, in watchings, in fastings;  By pureness, by knowledge, by longsuffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned,  By the word of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left,  By honour and dishonour, by evil report and good report: as deceivers, and yet true;  As unknown, and yet well known; as dying, and, behold, we live; as chastened, and not killed;  As sorrowful, yet alway rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing all things." 

 

These qualities are often mistakenly associated with the meaning of hagios.  Instead, these are the fruits of hagios, and pureness (hagnotes) is one of the fruits listed.

 

Hagnos, the adjective, is translated as clear, pure, and chaste.  Five of its occurrences are used in relation to men; the others relate to wisdom, things, and matters in the Corinthian church.  Our comments will be limited to those instances concerning men.

 

II Corinthians 11:2 says,

"For I am jealous over you with godly jealousy: for I have espoused you to one husband, that I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ." 

 

This refers to the Corinthian church and Paul's desire for them to meet the qualities for acceptance into the kingdom.

 

In I Timothy 5:22 Paul instructed Timothy to,

"Lay hands suddenly on no man, neither be partaker of other men's sins: keep thyself pure (hagnos)." 

 

In Titus 2:5 Paul advised women,

"To be discreet, chaste (hagnos), keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed." 

 

Peter also used hagnos in his first epistle when giving advice to women. 

"Likewise, ye wives, be in subjection to your own husbands; that, if any obey not the word, they also may without the word be won by the conversation of the wives;  While they behold your chaste (hagnos) conversation coupled with fear." (I Peter 3:1-2). 

 

I John 3:2-3 says,

"Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.  And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth (hagnizo) himself, even as he is pure (hagnos)."

 

There are two other scriptures which use the word pure.  The first is Philippians 4:8 which says we are to consider,

"whatsoever things are pure (hagnos)." 

 

The other is James 3:17, which says,

"But the wisdom that is from above is first pure (hagnos), then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy."

 

This brings to a conclusion those scriptures speaking of people's outward behavior.  Not one time was the word "holy" applied.  Why is it that today most people look at our outward behavior as the criterion for determining whether or not we are holy?  The scriptures clearly show that outward behavior is the wrong criterion.

 

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Hosios and hosiotes

 

The final words to be considered in this study are hosios, an adjective, and hosiotes, a noun.  The word hosios means merciful.  The word hosiotes (translated from the Hebrew word chasid, which means mercy) means to be intrinsically merciful, generally in reference to interior purity.

 

Hosiotes is used twice in the New Testament.  Luke 1:74-75 says,

"That he would grant unto us, that we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies might serve him without fear,  In holiness [hosiotes] and righteousness before him, all the days of our life." 

 

As this study has shown, righteous deeds are those based upon and motivated by love.  Mercy is very closely related to love.  Zacharias was prophesying that Jesus would be the means of Israel becoming free to serve God in mercy (holiness).

 

Ephesians 4:24 says,

"And that ye put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness." 

 

The Greek manuscript actually says "holiness of truth."  Paul was telling the Ephesians that they were to be renewed in the spirit of their minds.  They were a new creation, and they should believe it and put on the new man. 

 

Or, as he said in II Corinthians 5:14: 

"For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead." 

 

Why did Jesus die for all?  Paul gave the answer in II Corinthians 5:15: 

"And that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again."

 

In II Corinthians 5:17, Paul said,

"Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new." 

 

The grammar indicates that this "if" is in the first condition.  Paul was not using the word "if" in the sense of maybe, but as an assumed fact.  [See Grammar Terms Explained for the other three ways in which the Greeks used the word "if".

 

Paul was saying that if Christ died for everyone, which he did, then everyone died to sin, which they did, and there is a new creation, which there was.  He told the Ephesians to put on this new man.

 

In other words, everyone should believe what God has done.  Everyone was created in holiness and righteousness in the truth, and to live any other way is to live a lie.  Those not living according to the new way are not living in obedience to God but to themselves, which brings all the resultant problems of sin.  They are not living up to the new creation purchased for them by the death of Christ, the last Adam, the progenitor of this new creation.

 

There are only two places where the adjective hosios applies to men.  I Timothy 2:8 says,

"I will therefore that men pray every where, lifting up holy (hosios) hands, without wrath and doubting." 

 

And, Titus 1:8, which says an overseer must be,

"a lover of hospitality, a lover of good men, sober, just, holy (hosios, merciful), temperate."

 

Scripture tells us that men were created in mercy and righteousness, but nowhere do the scriptures speak of men as being holy in an absolute sense, only in a relative sense in the above two scriptures.  In fact, Revelation 15:4 says,

"Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest." 

 

Hebrews 7:26 also refers to the Lord: 

"For such an high priest became us, who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens."

 

Men cannot sanctify themselves; they are set apart (hagios) by God.  They are set apart in the word, in truth, in spirit, and in the name of Jesus.  All this was done that they might bear the fruits desired by God. 

 

The only active part men have is to sanctify (set apart) Jesus in their hearts, which enables them to produce the fruits God desires.  Realizing what God has done for them will result in their being hagnos, pure and chaste, in their actions, and this comes as the result of their sincere desire to serve God in love.  And, all of this comes by the grace of God.

 

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Summary Highlights of Monograph 8

 

#  In the scriptures, holy simply means something (deed, thing, person)

     set apart or dedicated to God.  This does not include the issue of

     morality, although that is the common connotation today.  A person

     may be sanctified, or holy (set apart to God), and still be immoral.  

#  When people say someone is holy, or that someone is a saint, they

     usually mean that the person is moral or has a superior spiritual

     goodness.  As this study will show, the Bible refers to people being

     made holy without their active participation.  

#  Things, as well as people, can be sanctified, or set apart to God.  

 

#  If the word of God, the truth, is believed and obeyed, it will

     continuously set one apart, or separate that one to God, at least in this

     life.

 

#  God does not forgive our sins when, or because, we believe or turn to

     him.  Turning to God, however, enables us to accept the truth of what

     God has already done.  

#  Their attitude of love was to be the spirit which set them apart, or

     sanctified them, from the world.  This should also be the aim of any

     who share the gospel with others: that they, too, may be set apart by a

     spirit of love in their lives and action, thereby becoming the sacrifice

     offered by those who shared the gospel with them.  

#  Jesus is our Lord and by his authority he becomes the one who

     sanctifies us in our daily lives.  Also, it is Jesus who is the Lord of our

     experiential sanctification as we live hour by hour.  

#  Saints are those who have been judicially set apart by God to Himself.

     In this context, it has no connotation of morality.  When Jesus died,

     God set all men in him, judicially (made them holy).  This was another

     grace, or gift, from God to humanity.  

#  However, we must be aware of the distinction between what the word

     "holy" means in the scriptures, and how the word "sacred" is used in

     pagan religions.  Saying something is sacred means it has value,

     religious value, above any other object of its kind.  The word "holy" is

     used in the scriptures to mean something is set apart to God, but that

     does not indicate that it has any more religious value than any other

     similar object.

 

#  Another common distortion is to use the word "holy" to indicate

     "pious" or "spiritual" behavior.  If speaking of behavior, it would

     usually be an act of love, or those actions done for the love of God, or

     love for other people.  

#  The name of Jesus is holy because it is more exalted than any other

     name could possibly be!  He has a name set apart from any other.  

 

#  Several scriptures describe people as set apart, or holy.  This does not

     mean that such people are more pious, or more moral, or more

     religious than others.  It means only that they were set apart for some

     particular purpose.  

 

#  When people come to the knowledge that God in his grace has set

     them apart, or made them holy, then they should be ready to serve

     him in love.  Obeying God is not akin to keeping the law, but it is

     necessary to reap the most from this life and that to come.  

 

#  The basic idea of the word holy means set apart; it is a matter of

     position rather than the moral character of those set apart.  Those set

     apart may or may not display good character.  All mankind was set

     apart by the death of Jesus, and some men certainly display unsavory

     character and immoral behavior.  

 

#  Everyone may be "set apart ones" now, but there will be another

     "setting apart" which takes place at the coming of Jesus Christ.  Those

     who are set apart at the coming of the christ will be the saints, or set

     apart ones, who will judge the world.  

 

#  The purpose of the church and its ministries should be developing the

     set apart ones so they will be considered worthy to enter the kingdom

     of God at the coming of the christ.  

 

#  The set apart ones are cautioned to walk in love in this life as a

     preparation for the next age, or kingdom of God.  

 

#  Paul constantly reminded people that all men had been set apart, that

     they have an inheritance which can be lost by living an ungodly life.  

 

#  There is a future "setting apart" which will occur at the coming of the

     christ, which is the consummation of our inheritance.  Although we

     are all heirs, not everyone will meet the requirements for coming into

     their inheritance.  We are granted an inheritance (saved) by grace, but

     our continued salvation depends upon our faith and our behavior.  

 

#  What we have been set apart to is the kingdom of God.  This is God's

     real purpose in all the setting apart, as well as the real meaning of

     being holy, or set apart ones.  

 

#  All these scriptures show that the spirit was set apart for specific

     purposes and, therefore, is referred to as the holy (set apart) spirit, just

     as the prophets were spoken of as being holy, or set apart.  

 

#  God wants everyone to participate in his coming kingdom, but

     Scripture teaches us that those who disregard him and live in rebellion

     will not enter.  

 

#  Our part is to yield to God so we may be used for righteous deeds

     which will allow entry into the kingdom, which is the aim of

     separation.  

 

#  Separation out from among the dead ones, the disobedient, is reserved

     for those whose lives have been animated and guided by God.  The

     reward is eternal (God-like) life and spending the next age with Jesus,

     the Christ.  

 

#  Everything has already been worked out by God.  Our part is to

     submit to him so he can also work everything out in our lives.  

 

#  By simply not being disobedient or unbelieving, any person may enter

     the kingdom.  

 

#  The fruit God expects from those he has separated is what many

     mistakenly define as sanctification itself.  

 

#  God sanctified us (made us holy, set us apart) to bear the fruit he

     expected.  He has planted us in the christ, the word, the truth, and

     spirit.  Everything necessary for us to bear the proper fruit has been

     done for us.  All we must do is yield ourselves to God, which only we

     can do.  

#  God does not require that we yield to him, he only requests that we do

     so.  Those who do yield are winners; those who do not are losers who

     will miss the future separation at the coming of the Lord.  

 

#  It is not a lack of sanctification, or separation, which will cause us grief,

     but not following separation.  God has set everyone apart, therefore

     everyone should follow that separation.  Some will; but, unfortunately,

     some will not.  

 

#  Most of Christianity seems to be focused upon a moralistic system

     instead of a faith system.  

 

#  Holy refers to position, not to qualities such as morality, piety, or

     godliness.  The true meaning of the word reveals that our position is a

     blessing from God, and that he expects us to bear fruit (such as

     morality, piety, and godliness) which will result in our entering the

     kingdom of God when Jesus Christ returns.  

 

#  Paul said that if Christ died for everyone (which he did) then everyone

     died to sin (which they did) and there is a new creation (which there

     was).  He also said to put on this new man.  In other words, everyone

     should believe what God has done.  

 

#  Everyone was created in holiness and righteousness in the truth, and to

     live any other way is to live a lie.  Those not living according to the new

     way are not living in obedience to God but to themselves, which brings

     all the resultant problems of sin.  They are not living up to the new

     creation purchased for them by the death of Christ, the last Adam, the

     progenitor of this new creation.  

 

#  Men cannot sanctify themselves; they are set apart by God.  They are

     set apart in the word, in truth, in spirit, and in the name of Jesus.  All

     this was done that they might bear the fruits desired by God.  

 

#  The only active part men have is to sanctify (set apart) Jesus in their

     hearts, which enables them to produce the fruits God desires.  Realizing

     what God has done for them will result in their being pure and chaste

     in their actions, and this comes as the result of their sincere desire to

     serve God in love.  And, all of this comes by the grace of God.  

 

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© 2009, Fred Kenison and Merrill Douglass. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.